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  1.    #1  
    Not that you have to fess up to reading pcmag.com but it is troubling that the guy reaches a large audience

    Dvorak Puff Piece
  2. #2  
    I thought I was the only one. I actually was going to write a reply, but then realized it really wouldn't matter.
    The guy has absolutely no clue.
    I work for a mobile consulting firm and have used EVERY device imaginable. I DEVELOP apps for palm devices, RIM devices and PocketPC devices. The guy knocks the device so badly, yet his arguments don't make sense.
    I let the lid snap closed and it dialed voice mail
    . What a moron. It cannot due that..he may have fat fingers and hit the jogdial.
    It has a dull and lifeless screen, especially compated with a Blackberry
    What the hell is he talking about? the 850/950 have a better screen? even if he is talking about the 857/957, does he mean the icons? I can't fathom what he is discussing. Unless he is comparing the "Dialer" to the RIM's default screen. Maybe hitting "apps" would make more sense.
    Or is he talking about contrast?

    You do have to configure the device somewhat to get it to work for you. You have to do the same for the Blackberry (registration for Cingular and Motient still is really bad for those devices & setting up a Redirector is painful to most new users).

    He then spends two paragraphs knocking V-stream.

    I would love to know what he thinks is the ultimate device..
    an Accompli? a PocketPC-based Phone? Nokia/RIM?
    One of the worst reviews from someone that doesn't seem to know what he is talking about
  3. #3  
    Let him tote around his 5 devices, and see what trends he follows in 3-4 months. Especially once they release GPRS and Treo is the smallest high-speed wireless solution available.
  4. #4  
    I guess I'll ring in here.

    Mine failed on a recent trip. The buttons wouldn't work, and the lid wouldn't turn on the unit. It was dead. But when I got home, it worked. And on more than one occasion, I let the lid snap closed and it dialed voice mail.

    While not spectacular, the reliability of the Treo is quite good. He began the article saying the design was flawed but reverts to a gripe about his particular unit. As for the voice mail, he just hit the jog dial before he closed it, or hit the space bar with the closing lid, two things I've not done yet.

    The keyboard should have those keys that transmit light though the plastic.

    YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!! Exactly, PLEASE, Handspring, never put out a keyboard w/o lights again!

    As for software, the unit defaults to speed-dial when you open the lid. It should default to the Palm desktop

    I agree with him here, too, but with ButtonsT, the problem is solved.

    And where is the clock?

    He should use the trick that puts the time and date on the speedial. Works like a charm for me.

    Finally, the service itself needs improvement.

    Again, right on. A CDMA phone would have been a much bigger hit in this country.
  5. #5  
    A couple more articles from ZDnet..

    From berlind , who likes the blackberry.

    From Somogyi , who like the Treo.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  6.    #6  
    Looks like I awoke the bumbling giant.

    Windy
  7. #7  
    John shouldn't open his mouth, every time he does you see how looney he really is

    Well my take on it is, any press for the Treo is good press. No one has anything really poor to say about it (remember before the Palm m505 came out everyone said the screen stunk months before it came out).

    I really hope Handspring kicks up the advertising blitz -- they are definitely going after a different market and not just the traditional PDA crowd.
  8. #8  
    Once again, Dvorak hits the nail on the head. I think many of you, about to invest $500 of your hard earned cash, don't want to hear the truth he is posting. For example:

    - He loves the idea of a PDA phone, it's in his opening paragraph. He agrees if the Treo did everything correctly, it might be a blackberry (or "crackberry" as we call them at work) killer.

    - He's right about the mechanics of the lid-switch. These tend to be very delicate structures and piling features into a hinge switch is asking for disaster. The posts on the old Visorcentral site about speaker failures attest to this inherent weakness. Back to the good ol' standard ON/OFF (or more accurately STBY/ON)button is the right way to go.

    - On-Off Button: When I first played with this I couldn't believe how odd the multi-press concept seemed. Simpler is better - not something you have to check and double check whenever you use it.

    - The screen he refers to is the Treo 180's and he's right. It's dull and lifeless, and the "backlight" is simply a joke. He uses RIM as a contrasting example - and is correct - something the Handspring folks should listen to (I mean, if you can't build a better B&W screen than a blackberry, you should consider leaving the business). Treo 270 has no problems in the screen dept for those willing to pay for color.

    - Lighted keyboard - Treo 270 fixed this too - no planned fix for the B&W cheapskates though.

    - And the speed dial screen - I agree. Even Visorphone does this better with a separate "hot button" on the cartridge. I like being able to turn on my visorphone to my launcer or my speed dial by choice. I hate having to work past the speed dial EVERYTIME I open my Treo.

    - The clock-in-the-window has been fixed with a fine 3rd party piece of software - can't believe Handspring didn't see this coming - Palm has had this software since the M100 came out in 1999.

    - As for Voicestream, he's quite right - they really are a bush league service. They even make Sprint seem like a great wireless company! It's too bad because it gives way too many people in this country and excuse to use CDMA! A single standard, worldwide, would make my life a lot simpler.

    All in all I think John's article is a fair assessment - delieverd in his typical "in your face" style. Handspring has partially addressed some of his 180 issues in the Treo 270 and Dvorak said it would take an interation - or two - to get it right. Seems to me people in this forum are a bit springloaded to the pissed-off position about it.

    Kupe
  9.    #9  
    The reason I took issue with Dvorak's opinion piece was because it was your typical pcmag "glass half-full" column. There are always ways to improve a product but Dvorak should have given as much weight to what the Treo can do as he devoted to it's perceived weaknesses.

    Windy
  10. #10  
    No, the problem with the column was the amount of misinformation. Many of the problems he cites can be easily fixed (or avoided if used properly). I guess he didn't do the modest legwork required to find the solutions, or maybe he just wasn't interested - given his tone, that's how it seems.

    TM
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by Kupe
    - The screen he refers to is the Treo 180's and he's right. It's dull and lifeless, and the "backlight" is simply a joke. He uses RIM as a contrasting example - and is correct - something the Handspring folks should listen to (I mean, if you can't build a better B&W screen than a blackberry, you should consider leaving the business). Treo 270 has no problems in the screen dept for those willing to pay for color.

    That's interesting because the backlight on my Treo 180g's screen is considerably brighter than the backlight on the Visor Pro and Platinum which admittedly, suck.
    - And the speed dial screen - I agree. Even Visorphone does this better with a separate "hot button" on the cartridge. I like being able to turn on my visorphone to my launcer or my speed dial by choice. I hate having to work past the speed dial EVERYTIME I open my Treo.

    TreoButton or ButtonsT fix this problem easily.
    - The clock-in-the-window has been fixed with a fine 3rd party piece of software - can't believe Handspring didn't see this coming - Palm has had this software since the M100 came out in 1999.

    The clock-in-the-window problem can be fixed by renaming one of your Speed Dial entries &time.
    - As for Voicestream, he's quite right - they really are a bush league service. They even make Sprint seem like a great wireless company! It's too bad because it gives way too many people in this country and excuse to use CDMA! A single standard, worldwide, would make my life a lot simpler.

    That depends on where are in the country. Here in Chicago, VoiceStream's service is better than Sprint's service.

    All in all I think John's article is a fair assessment - delieverd in his typical "in your face" style. Handspring has partially addressed some of his 180 issues in the Treo 270 and Dvorak said it would take an interation - or two - to get it right. Seems to me people in this forum are a bit springloaded to the pissed-off position about it.
    The problem with John's "in your face" style is that when his opinion differs from your own, it is annoying. It's amazing how often I agreed with him back when he was bashing Push technology and other silly ideas. But I like my Treo 180g. I have just upgraded to the 270 and I like it. Therefore John's opinion seems like mindless whining to me.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by Windy
    The reason I took issue with Dvorak's opinion piece was because it was your typical pcmag "glass half-full" column. There are always ways to improve a product but Dvorak should have given as much weight to what the Treo can do as he devoted to it's perceived weaknesses.

    Windy
    I couldn't agree with you more Windy.

    I own a 180 and have been very happy with it. And I don't regret paying the amount of money for it as Kupe suggests. You've got to consider things in relative terms. "Pound for pound, dollar for dollar", the Treo is the better solution out there right now. The PPC Thera is selling for $800 with a two year contract (yikes!). The blackberry lacks the ability to effectively surf the web - and it's attempt at being a phone is laughable. The blackberry, too, is selling for greater than the Treo.

    I think the problem with people like Kupe and Mr. Dvorak is that they have been caught up in the backlash bandwagon that has resulted from the pre-lease hype of the Treo back in the Fall of last year. And as a result, they have failed to see things in relative terms - and tend to focus on the negatives without any consideration for the positives. "I'll show people that I wasn't a mindless sheep that got caught up in the pre-lease hype..." What they should do is resist the backlash as the resisted the hype and take a step back and look at the big picture.

    I've noticed that this group also includes those who simply can't afford the Treo - it's a textbook defense mechanism. "I can't afford it, so I'll only focus on the negatives to convince myself that I don't want it." Let's not forget that up till the end of last year, high end cell phones like the Motorola V60T was selling for around $300 (with no web browsing capabilities). Nokia has similarly priced cell phones as well.
  13. #13  
    Could it be that his real beef with the Treo is that its keyboard is . . . QUERTY?
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by uncledrunkle
    . . . they have failed to see things in relative terms - and tend to focus on the negatives without any consideration for the positives.
    In much the same way that people in this thread are defensive about the negatives. After 6 months using a Treo 180, it had become my "Blackberry." As a phone, it is truly lacking. I would never buy a phone with the phone-only features of the Treo. As a wireless messenger, it's not too bad. As a PDA, it's a Palm and is therefore quite functional. And therein lies the rub . . .

    I use a real phone now (Motorola 270C), that has real phone features, acts like a phone (for example you dial the tactile buttons without looking at it - not a flat glass screen), weighs like a phone, and is sturdy like a phone (anyone else scared to death when you get caught in the rain with your Treo on your beltclip? Feel the same fears about a real phone? Me neither ).

    I also use an Audivox Maestro. It's lighter than a Treo, with a bigger screen than a Treo, and does more out of the box than a Treo (like have email with real attachments and the ability to actually read/write word/excel docs received as attachments) for about half the price of a Treo (got mine for $250). And unlike a Treo, it has expansion slots so I can expand the memory (128 mb SD card and a 256 mb CF card most of the time), or put in my cheap ($99) WiFi card around the house, or stick in my $129 Bluetooth card, and use my Bluetooth capable Motorola 270C as a modem while it sits in my pocket, on my belt, or across the room.

    My Treo got fired when the 270 came out and I saw there was still no way to even back it up when traveling unless I carried along a laptop. This might improve when GPRS comes out, but I doubt it.

    What I'm pointing out is there are still a lot of options for folks desiring a broad spectrum of wireless communications. John Dvorak is quite familiar with them. He took the Treo 180 out for a test drive and like anyone that is testing something, looked for its shortfalls. I would much rather hear about a product's shortcomings than hear a bunch of hype (like the WSJ Treo cheerleader) that does nothing to help my purchase decision. The goodness of a product is a lot easier to recognize.

    But if you're one of those people that only cares to hear positive things, let me highly recommend the Motorola 270C, PocketPC, Bluetooth approach for . . . about $599 with service. Cost more than Treo? You bet. Get more than Treo? A lot more.

    Kupe

    EDIT Add: The QWERTY comment is priceless Gameboy70!
  15. #15  
    This sounds like my Nokia 9210 is a far better unit if not for its size versus a PDA that can potentially lose its data. I haven't feared losing data on my 16 MB 9210 even after a week of use. Initially, I did back up almost everyday after seeing iPAQs lose their data just like that.

    This is one problem that appeared to me as common among PDA products.

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