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  1.    #1  
    There has been a lot of talk about Palm getting bought out by a number of different companies over the last couple of years, and it would seem that if there was an interested buyer that they would have made it happen last year while Palm was as cheap as it was going to get. Of course, after today, it might get cheaper, but I still doubt that we will see any companies stepping up for the buy anytime soon. Palm's patent portfolio is strong, and its financials are weak which means that any company who wants to buy Palm will have to invest billions to make it happen, but then would lose money trying to make it profitable.

    I have maintained that the only company out there that really stands a chance at taking Palm and making it work is Microsoft. They have the capital to do it, and they have played nice with Palm in the past. Nokia could do it, as could Google, but the only reason why either of them would want to do it is to stave off Apple. But, losing to Apple and coming to some sort of licensing agreement with Apple will probably cost less than buying Palm, so why would they do it? HTC, RIM, and the other manufacturers just don't have enough cash laying around to make it happen. (Well, Apple does, but we all know that ain't gonna happen.)

    So, if Palm isn't to be bought out, at least not unless they just roll over and give the company away, then I think, given today's financials, that Palm should begin actively seeking investments from and partnerships with Microsoft, and any of the other non-Apple tech companies active in the smartphone space.

    Now what I propose is very risky for Palm, and some serious number crunching would need to happen before contracts are drawn up, but Palm is a very precarious position right now, and if they are able to raise even a few hundred million dollars, it would be a huge help to them in the short term, and could provide continued sources of cash in the long term. It may be worth the risk.

    Palm could sell limited renewable term licenses that would offer other manufacturers access to Palm's touch screen patents, allowing them a measure of protection from Apple on FUTURE touch screen implementations.

    The current Apple wranglings with Nokia and HTC would have to be settled on their own merits, of course, and a big risk for Palm will be if Apple succeeds in these lawsuits. BUT, those lawsuits will probably take years to even reach litigation, in which time Palm can complete it's turn-around. And Google can use those patents in it's Android development TOMORROW, making Apple's lawsuit against HTC a very small target for Apple to shoot at.

    The beauty of this is that Palm can sell these to all of the competitors, which would level the playing field for them to compete with Apple for a small investment, and providing Palm with much needed cash AND guaranteeing that Palm will NEVER sue them for patent infringement. And they won't mind helping Palm out a little bit because Palm is still going to remain a pretty small player in a very huge and quicly growing market. And since the licenses are limited and renewable, Palm can look to see that cash infusion at regular intervals in the future as long as the patents remain valuable.

    So no buy-outs, no illegitimate android-webos-wp7s children running amok on users, and no belly-ups for Palm. What could be better?
    Last edited by amateurhack; 03/19/2010 at 12:56 AM. Reason: changed a word to avoid censoring
  2. #2  
    Yes but all this will risk Palm's life even more. If I give away my technology and competitive strengths to my competition, and they incorporate it in their products which are already selling more than mine due to their marketing muscle + good product quality, won't I die in the long run??

    Palm needs to bring out better quality hardware, keep on its course of regular OTA's, and grow the app catalog to about 10,000+ with atleast 20-30% of these being useful apps in every category - navigation, gaming, productivity, business etc

    Considering that they have cash for around 6-8 quarters, they should forget cross-licensing deals and concentrate only on their products, expand their markets, and for God's sake sell unlocked devices too so that they get more reach across the world!
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by abhinandanjain View Post
    Yes but all this will risk Palm's life even more. If I give away my technology and competitive strengths to my competition, and they incorporate it in their products which are already selling more than mine due to their marketing muscle + good product quality, won't I die in the long run??

    Palm needs to bring out better quality hardware, keep on its course of regular OTA's, and grow the app catalog to about 10,000+ with atleast 20-30% of these being useful apps in every category - navigation, gaming, productivity, business etc

    Considering that they have cash for around 6-8 quarters, they should forget cross-licensing deals and concentrate only on their products, expand their markets, and for God's sake sell unlocked devices too so that they get more reach across the world!
    Well, I'm only talking about touch screen patents, not WebOS. The touchscreen patents are already "out-of-the-bag" if you will, and Palm is only really offering safe-harbor.

    If they can't produce phones to generate income, they will not have enough cash to last that long, let alone develop any new hardware. That is where their current inventory situation is really going to hurt them. Right now, they can't afford to make phones.

    Other than that, I agree with the spirit of your comments.

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