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  1.    #1  
    Does anyone know when this is supposed to be out. They told everyone the end of april or may. I wouldn't of bought one if I knew it was going to be longer than that. Basically I could of kept my nokia and palm vx and saved a bundle.

    Also will the treo 270 be available with graffiti? It better I don't know if I would like the keyboard. I used to love the sharp wizards with the keyboards, then palm came out and I had to learn graffiti. I don't know if I could go back. The main reason I like the graffiti is easy launch, I love that program. I can't imagine a launcher as good as that with the keyboard. Also the keyboard is supposed to save you from using the stylus so much. On forms etc. on the screen how do you move between fields without using the stylus? It seems like it would be more trouble holding a stylus and then going back and forth between the keyboard and tapping the screen.
  2. #2  
    I have been told September for GPRS release. This may be dependant on your carrier though. You may want to check with them for an update.
  3. #3  
    the 270 will not have a graffiti model. I have heard that the 180 outsells the 180G by a big margin. The people have spoken!
  4. #4  
    According to Handspring's own web page:

    "In the second half of the year, Handspring plans to offer a software upgrade that enables Treo to work on GPRS networks."

    Could it be December?!
    Last edited by DougI; 05/22/2002 at 02:35 PM.
  5.    #5  
    Will the color model be available with GPRS or just with CDMA?
  6. #6  
    Both. Although the GSM model will probably have to await the GPRS upgrade "patch" just like the 180s do.

    Paul
  7.    #7  
    Do you have an opinion on which one CDMA or GPRS will be superior and why?
  8. #8  
    I am going to say GPRS, although you will find that people will be highly opinionated about it.

    GPRS is always on, allowing data to be pushed over the GSM network to a device (like the Treo). This will come in useful for mail notification for example.

    CDMA 1X is not always on (will require QNC), but CDMA 1XEV will be. Not sure which Qualcomm chip Airprime is using in the CDMA 270 version.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Glenn K
    GPRS is always on, allowing data to be pushed over the GSM network to a device (like the Treo). This will come in useful for mail notification for example.

    CDMA 1X is not always on (will require QNC), but CDMA 1XEV will be. Not sure which Qualcomm chip Airprime is using in the CDMA 270 version.
    But -- isn't CDMA faster (if that matters for e-mail, I don't know)?

    And -- although the new BlackBerry (with a phone) uses GPRS, didn't the previous models use CDMA, which certainly offers always-on e-mail?
    Last edited by DougI; 05/22/2002 at 02:36 PM.
  10. #10  
    Um, I thought the "old" Blackberries used the old BellSouth packet data network (not a phone network at all...).

    Paul
  11. #11  
    See responses below:

    But -- isn't CDMA faster (if that matters for e-mail, I don't know)?

    >>>> Right now, the speed the carriers are claiming - 144Kbps, 56Kbps, or whatever, are theoretical maximums - heavily dependant on network traffic and location proximity to the cell tower. Both CDMA and GPRS will be between 28 and 33Kbps for the foreseeable future as further network upgrades (EDGE, WCDMA, and 1X EV) happen over time.

    And -- although the new BlackBerry (with a phone) uses GPRS, didn't the previous models use CDMA, which certainly offers always-on e-mail?

    >>>>Blackberry has two models that support paging networks (DataTAC and Mobitex) and naturally have push notification.
  12. #12  
    Here's are the ultimate issues, for which no one yet seems able to provide any information other than a guess: When will the Treo actually have always-on e-mail? Which version will have always-on e-mail first, the GPRS version or the CDMA version? When? What will be the pricing for always-on e-mail? Will there be a flat-rate fee for always-on e-mail (as with BlackBerry and Palm's i705)? If so, what will the fee be?
  13. #13  
    I agree, always on functionality is critical to success of these devices. I know for a fact that GPRS will support push notification as a function of the network. CDMA 1X will not support always on as it will still require QNC, or Quick Network Connect, meaning that the data circuit has to be opened like in traditional dialup. Although this will be a much faster connection, it will still require the user to engage the data connection.

    GPRS remains active and online all the time.

    What I'm not sure about is how Treo Mail will take advantage of GPRS or CDMA 1X. I know it utilizes timed polling of the mail server (not push), but the way each carrier allows data connectivity is different, making a "one solution fits all" application elusive.

    I am thinking you will see a variety of push/pull mail solutions come to market (from 3rd party and carriers) in the next few months, but if were my money, I would pick the GPRS model as the network architecture is more suited to your needs.
  14. #14  
    what i'd like to see is AIM push'd to my Treo like a Palm i7xx or my blackberry.
    -- Go Illini!
  15. #15  
    I'm not sure how the RIMs do it, but the i705 does not have 'true' always-on e-mail. From what I have read, the server sends a SMS message to the i705 telling the person to check their mail.

    Could the Treo somehow do something similar is what I'm wondering...
    Blue Visor Deluxe ~ Clie T615 ~ Zire 71 ~ Treo 650 ~ Palm Centro
  16. #16  
    Handspring already offers EXACTLY this service via TreoMail. It'll cost you $50 a year.



    Originally posted by terrysalmi
    I'm not sure how the RIMs do it, but the i705 does not have 'true' always-on e-mail. From what I have read, the server sends a SMS message to the i705 telling the person to check their mail.

    Could the Treo somehow do something similar is what I'm wondering...
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by hyperenough
    Handspring already offers EXACTLY this service via TreoMail. It'll cost you $50 a year.
    Sorry, I'm not a Treo Owner, and I didn't realize this is how TreoMail worked. Thanks for letting me know, though!
    Blue Visor Deluxe ~ Clie T615 ~ Zire 71 ~ Treo 650 ~ Palm Centro
  18. #18  
    Sorry for the long post. I would just do a hyperlink but this article is in a pay site and is not accessible to none members. Anyways, he has some interesting things to say about Treo Mail and how it operates on the Sprint CDMA network.


    Handspring's Treo Now Offers
    Push E-Mail Like BlackBerry

    Handspring's new Treo communicator keeps getting better. It's already the best combination phone and personal digital assistant available. But Handspring is enhancing the Treo after only a few months on the market.

    Next week, the company will introduce a long-awaited color version, the Treo 270, at $499 with a cellphone-service contract. That's $100 more than the current Treo 180 monochrome model, but $100 less than the company originally estimated. The bright new color screen is very nice and is powered by a slightly larger battery, so battery life is a bit better than on the monochrome model. There will also be a new low-end color model, the $299 Treo 90, which omits the built-in phone.

    The most important news about the Treo, however, isn't about hardware. It's the introduction 10 days ago of the company's optional "push" e-mail service, called Treo Mail, which works on all models with built-in phones. Push e-mail, popularized by RIM's BlackBerry hand-helds, is a service that automatically sends e-mail from your regular e-mail box to a hand-held device over a wireless connection.


    Treo Mail


    Treo Mail comes in two versions. The corporate edition, which costs $100 a year, redirects your company's Outlook e-mail to the Treo. The Internet edition works with e-mail from Internet providers like EarthLink, Prodigy or Yahoo. It costs $50 a year (that's year, not month). There's also a 30-day free trial. Those fees don't include whatever it costs on your cellular billing plan to actually make the calls that Treo Mail places to fetch your e-mail.

    I've been testing the Internet edition of Treo Mail with an EarthLink e-mail account for a couple of months, and it works pretty well. It can fetch and send e-mail as often as every half hour, or you can set it to only send and retrieve e-mail when you manually initiate a connection.

    The e-mails are displayed in a very readable way. Each is described in a two-line header showing sender, time and subject. When you tap on the summary, you get the text of the e-mail. Unlike the BlackBerry, which typically shows just the header and a portion of the text, the default settings for Treo Mail allow you to read the entire text of most e-mails without having to do an additional download.

    Messages you receive via the Internet edition of Treo Mail remain on your e-mail provider's server, so you can also view them later on a PC. This is especially important because the Treo can't open attachments, which you need to view on a PC.

    Mail delivery is fast -- much faster than on the BlackBerry -- partly due to the fact that the cellphone network is faster than the pager network used by most BlackBerry models.

    I have a few gripes about the Treo Mail software. There's no command for quickly jumping to the top or bottom of a long list of e-mails, and if you like to use a blind copy-address line, you have to separately enable it for each e-mail composed. It's also hard to mark which e-mails you already read before a certain date.

    The biggest downsides of Treo Mail, however, have to do with the cellphone network. Each time you send and receive e-mail, the Treo must place a call. As with any cellphone call, lots of them don't go through or are dropped in the middle, especially if you're in a fringe reception area. This rarely happens with the BlackBerry.

    Also, the e-mail calls can run up your phone bill. In my tests, the Treo's e-mail calls were usually a minute or less. But if you are checking e-mail every half hour, as I was, these calls add up fast. Though each one is cheap, cumulatively they boosted my monthly bill by over $100. You can switch to a plan with more free minutes, or check e-mail less often, of course. But this is a disadvantage the BlackBerry doesn't suffer.

    For this reason, heavy e-mail users may want to wait to buy a Treo until this summer, when Sprint's version will come out. It will work on Sprint's forthcoming high-speed network, providing a nearly always-on experience for downloading e-mail, much like the BlackBerry does, eliminating the need to constantly place calls to get e-mail. It will also download mail much faster than the current Treo and will offer billing plans oriented toward heavy data use, thus limiting runaway phone bills.

    The bottom line, however, is that the Treo now has a new capability: automatic reception of e-mail. That means it can replace a separate phone and PDA -- and a BlackBerry as well.

    Write to Walter S. Mossberg at mossberg@wsj.com

    Updated May 23, 2002
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by uncledrunkle
    Sorry for the long post. I would just do a hyperlink but this article is in a pay site and is not accessible to none members. Anyways, he has some interesting things to say about Treo Mail and how it operates on the Sprint CDMA network.
    A few comments:

    (1) The column is also available on a non-pay site maintained by The Wall Street Journal at http://ptech.wsj.com/ptech.html

    (2) Copying the entire text of an article and pasting it onto a discussion board can amount to copyright infringement. That's why it's not a good idea to do so. See http://www.gigalaw.com/articles/copyright.html

    (3) A discussion about this article is also ongoing elsewhere on treocentral, at http://discussion.treocentral.com/tc...threadid=23434
  20. #20  
    this WSJ story omitted the fact that with the GPRS upgrade, the 180 and 270 will support always on mail in some form without the need for timed dialup connection.
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