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  1. #21  
    Originally posted by ToolkiT
    Correction again, 900/1900 for US 900/1800 for the rest of the world...
    This is correct, but...
    Follow up Question: how good is the 900 network in the US?
    I suppose you missed my previous post. There is no 900 network in the US. There is 800 (analog and digital) and 1900 (digital). Only GSM1900 phones will currently work in the US. New phones will have to be released to support AT&T and Cingular's GSM800 network.
    and can I buy a prepaid sim for the 900 network in the US so I can use my phone over there?
    Nope, unless it (the phone) can be used on the 1900MHz spectrum as well. Apologies if all those 900s were supposed to be 1900s.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  2. wjs
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    #22  
    Originally posted by chrisfoster

    ... I remember fondly talking to friends while traveling though the subways of Berlin. No way you can do that in America
    Well, my Treo gets a strong signal and works just fine in New York City subways and even on the trains in the basement of Grand Central Terminal.
    Bill Spencer
  3. #23  
    Originally posted by ToolkiT

    Coverage is exelent indeed, however, your provider has to have a roaming contract with the foreign providers to make you phone (or more correct your SIM) work abroad...
    Check the website of your provider before you travel..might save you from a dissapointment..
    True, True.. Make sure you have signed up for international roaming about a month before leaving for Europe. Basically, its sets you up to allow the overseas carriers to forward charges to you U.S. based carrier to be placed on your monthly statement. I believe they do an additional credit check as well, or revierw the credit check they did when you enrolled with the carrier.
  4. #24  
    Originally posted by wjs


    Well, my Treo gets a strong signal and works just fine in New York City subways and even on the trains in the basement of Grand Central Terminal.
    Yes, Grand Central has improved by leaps and bounds. But I still had trouble getting CDMA signal in the Metro-North trains, but of course, that's Verizon's fault. (I can't wait to drop them for my Treo)

    Originally posted by LarryN


    Make sure you have signed up for international roaming about a month before leaving for Europe.


    A Month! I'm going next thursday , and I havn't even picked up my Treo yet!

    Originally posted by ToolkiT


    Coverage is exelent indeed, however, your provider has to have a roaming contract with the foreign providers to make you phone (or more correct your SIM) work abroad...


    My provider is going to be VoiceStream (Since here in the North Shore area they think cell towers are the work of the devil, there's nothing else GSM and barely that), and I thought international roaming was activated by default. I don't remember ever calling them up over my old GSM phone..it just, worked.

    But thanks for the heads up, i'll remember to ask about that when I activate my phone. And just in case..i'll bring my old GSM phone along.
    -- Go Illini!
  5. #25  
    Hey Chris,

    When I took out my VS subscription last year, I asked for international roaming to be enabled there and then. My memory is a bit fuzzy on the exact sequence of events but: They do another quick credit check in the store I think, and if you pass, they'll take a home or work number, and a VS international roaming department representative will call you within 24 hours. When this person calls you, you have to verify who you are. I can't remember if they do another credit check or not, but if everything's OK they will activate your international roaming and it should be working another 24-48 hours after that. If you're in the US, you can check if its working by making an international call. They seem to have international calling from the US, and international roaming as ONE feature.

    At least that's what happened in my case anyway. Everything was set up within 48 hours of starting my service.

    Mind you I have a friend who later subscribed to voicestream and went to europe and voicestream NEVER set up his roaming. I'm not sure what the deal there was though.

    Basically, as long as you oass the extra credit check, and are available when the VS international person calls you up, it should be fine. If you have any hassles, the VS international department number (the same folk who'll call you) is +1 813 348 5596

    You have another option though. If you buy the Treo through the HS website, I don't believe it will be locked to VS in this case. If you go to Europe, but VS has not enabled your roaming, you can buy a european prepaid card and put it in your Treo.

    The disadvantage will be that callers will have to call a European number to get you, but for you all your calls you make should be cheaper than if you were roaming, and you won't have to pay for incoming calls.
    --
    Craig Campbell
  6.    #26  
    Originally posted by ToolkiT

    Correction again, 900/1900 for US 900/1800 for the rest of the world...

    As for simlock I guess it is a terminology thing, everywhere but in the US a simlock is used where providers have locked your phone for just their SIMs...
    Quote me correctly if you are going to correct me:

    I said "Service Provider Locked" which is different than SimLock.
    A simlock is the same here as downunder. It allows you to assign a pin to lock the card/phone from unauthorized use.

    A service provide lock is where the phone will only work with the provider, such as VoiceStream, from whom you bought the phone. This is because most service in the US is sold on a 1 year contract basis, and they figure most people won't hassle with unlocking it because they don't understand it. Companies here also will be very difficult about unlocking the phone if you cancel your contract with them before getting the phone unlocked.

    Frankly, in the US, prepaid isn't that good. Figure a contract will cost you $US 150-200 to cancel + the service you used versus
    spending $US100 for phone + 25mins of talk time.

    -henry
  7. #27  
    I can confirm positively that the Treo is able to select a network when your in another country. It checks the available networks from which it can receive a signal. You can select a network when your home provider has roaming contract with the "abroad" provider. You will notice this easily, if you can't connect to a certain network, ther is probably no roaming contract.

    A very usefull tip: ALWAYS check before you go abroad, the tariffs of the different networks in the country you're visiting. Almost all European providers have roaming contract with eachother, but tariffs can differ substantially. There are a lot of sites which compare these tariffs. This goeds for two things:
    1. You are abroad and want to call to you're home-country. The tariffs your are subjected to, are set by your own provider. Check that website, for the cheapest provider in the country you're visiting. Select and use that provider when you're abroad making thes kind of calls.
    2. You are abroad and want to call to a local number or a mobile number of that country (not of your home-country). Check the cheapest provider in that country and then use that provider for making those calls. You won't find those tariffs on your providers site. However, there are alot of sites where you can compare.

    Daan
  8. #28  
    Some additional information on pre-paid cards in Europe:

    I have 5 prepaid cards and 3 mobile phone with them from D1 (Deutsche Telekom). And I have a normal subscription card with two phones, and another phone with no card.

    All of the cards are "free" and work in any "normal" phone.

    Three of the phones were bought together with a card,
    the first (oldest phone) works with any card, this phone was bought before they started using SIM-lock. The other two phones work with every D1 Xtra pre-paid card but these phones refuse to accept the subscription card which also a D1 card!.

    This means that all of the locked phones are limited to a provider and the type of service. But the SIM cards are not locked to a particular telephone.

    The other "not locked" phones accept all of the the pre-paid SIM cards.

    Therefor a word of warning to all "foreigners" ;-) If you buy a phone in Germany with a pre-paid card from D1 then you will not be able to use cards from other providers in the same telephone.
    But, if you plan your holiday carefully then you could buy a pre-paid card+phone this year, and return it next year to get it unlocked ;-) because they offer this after one year.

    Another thing to remember, a D1 pre-paid card expires automatically 15 months after activation. This period is extended by 6 months if you pay in about 15 EUR or 12 months with about 30 EUR. (Don't nail me on these amounts, I don't use this type of service).
  9. #29  
    Originally posted by craigcampbell


    You have another option though. If you buy the Treo through the HS website, I don't believe it will be locked to VS in this case. If you go to Europe, but VS has not enabled your roaming, you can buy a european prepaid card and put it in your Treo.

    Cool! I didn't even think about that! How much do those cost? I'm looking to mostly use it for Internet calls to Earthlink, which leads to my other question, how sucessfull have any international travelers been with data calls to US-International ISPs?
    -- Go Illini!
  10. #30  
    Hmmm - I'm sorry I don't know how data calls will work if you're roaming abroad with VS. It would depend on how the roaming agreement was set up between VS and the foreign network, as to whether the foreign network will let you do it or not. Technologically there is no problem though.

    If you buy a prepaid card in europe itself, you would have to ask if it will let you do data calls or not. I would maybe check the websites of the foreign providers you want to use, maybe even call them up and ask:

    1) If I am roaming on your network, and my home provider is Voicestream in the US, can I make data calls on your network, and how much will it cost?
    Also, Voicestream themselves may be able to answer this question.

    You can get a list of all worldwide GSM networks, with links to most of the providers' pages at: http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/gsminfo/index.shtml

    2) If I buy a prepaid card for your network, can I make data calls and how much does it cost?

    As an aside, when I moved to the US 2 years ago from the UK, I was able to make data calls here in Illinois while roaming with VS from my home UK provider, Virgin Mobile. (who I'd recommend wholeheartedly if you're ever visiting the UK - or I would if the Treo worked with them. Unfortunately, they're an 1800MHz network, so the US Treo (900/1900) won't work on them:-( Damn, now I have to change my UK provider when I go back to visit :-( Oh well...)

    As another aside, I was able to roam on Voicestream in Chicagoland for over a year before they actually launched service here! Their network was up and working (though coverage was REALLY patchy and they were obviously building madly) - they just wouldn't sell service on it. I actually got a lot of calls and SMSs free during this time! Alas no more.....

    Craig
    --
    Craig Campbell
  11. #31  
    I've been reading VoiceStream's docs on the subject on roaming, and I discovered that they've restructured the rates since I was last in Europe. They now have flat rates per country; you can no longer select a different rate between roaming partners inside a country.

    Also, the 1800 band seems pretty popular in Italy, but luckly 900 is still supported. Does anyone think that Handspring will make a tri-mode version of the Treo? Why didn't they do this from the start; i've have a tri-mode GSM phone for almost 3 years now.

    There's been some talk about global SMS. I wonder if VoiceStream's AIM over SMS would work when i'm in Europe?(since I can't bring my AOL Communicator, that'd be my best bet at wireless AIM other then my expensive and battery taxing Earthlink account)
    -- Go Illini!
  12. #32  
    1. I read about the $299 best buy deal in this forum and went to best buy for treo on APr 6th.

    2. I got the $299 deal. I asked the sales person about the additional $50 best buy rebate available in some locations.
    He had no knowledge about it and said no such rebate is available.

    3. But when the sales person printed the receipt an additional $50 best buy rebate receipt was also printed. Noone in best buy seems to be aware of this extra $50 rebate. The best buy I went to is in Austin, Texas.

    3. After coming home I called voice stream and asked them about unlocking the phone for overseas use. They said it is not a problem and can unlock it if I'm going out of the country.

    4. Yesterday (apr 12th) I went to best buy again and saw that the price is still $299 (but this time it is $399 - $100 mail-in rebate). The deal is till Apr 20th.

    5. In Best buy you won't get the graffiti version 180g.
  13. #33  
    Originally posted by chrisfoster
    There's been some talk about global SMS. I wonder if VoiceStream's AIM over SMS would work when i'm in Europe?(since I can't bring my AOL Communicator, that'd be my best bet at wireless AIM other then my expensive and battery taxing Earthlink account)
    I used international roaming to contact both AIM, and to do a little surfing. I actually kept in contact with my office in every country I visited via AIM.

    SMS is so much more prevalent in Europe that I believe the default account setup is with data enabled. When I connected to the internet, I was calling my U.S. based ISP.

    Of course, you're probably already in Europe, or going shortly, but thought I'd reply anyway. Hope you are having fun, and everythign's working for you. Give us a report when you return.
  14. #34  
    Why is this a shocker? Best Buy stores located in Voicestream service areas will offer the phone thru Voicestream of course. That's how you get that low price of $299, because Voicesteam is subsidizing the products actual cost.

    If someone wants a stand-alone Treo, then they would have to go to Handspring.com. Every phone that Best Buy sells has some sort of provider stipulation.
  15. #35  
    I just got back from my 11 days in Europe, and I must say, my Treo proformed better then I ever expected.

    I got it on April 10th, with all the rebates (I hope that they havn't expired, i didn't do them before I left)

    2 importent notes. 1, AIM over SMS worked great, though I despise QuickChat. For 12 bucks, I expected better.

    and second, my Best Buy Treo worked perfectly with a pre-paid SIM from a TIM store. No SIM-lock problems, or whatever. The guy behind the counter even knew Palm ("I prefer the stick", he said, when i told him he could use the keyboard ), and set me up with TIM ISP services, which I could call even with my VoiceStream SIM (As long as I was on the TIM network)

    All in all, very sucessfull.
    -- Go Illini!
  16.    #36  
    Chris,

    Thanks for the that Great summary!

    -henry
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