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  1.    #1  
    After about 10 good reviews, this is the first bad one I've seen. There are plenty of future improvements I'd like to see with the Treo, but it seems like this guy is looking for the bad only:

    http://www.siliconvalley.com/docs/op...t/ml011702.htm
  2. #2  
    Some "highlights":

    Handspring quietly stopped manufacturing VisorPhone last year...
    From the FAQ:
    Q. Will you continue selling VisorPhone?
    A. Yes, VisorPhone is for those people who want the additional functionality of the Springboard expansion slot whereas the Treo communicator is for those people who don't need that additional functionality. If a customer wants an eyemodule digital camera or a GPS receiver, they'll want a Visor handheld.
    The Treo model 270 with a color screen, due in summer
    Didn't Dubinski just say 2003?

    For the same $400, you could easily get both a mobile phone smaller and lighter than the 5.4-ounce Treo, as well as a Palm or Handspring PDA.
    Where does he shop?

    VoiceStream, because both carriers add per-minute charges for data calls.
    NOT.
    Jeff
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by PDAENVY
    For the same $400, you could easily get both a mobile phone smaller and lighter than the 5.4-ounce Treo, as well as a Palm or Handspring PDA.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Where does he shop?
    Anywhere. It's easy to find a phone that's smaller and lighter than the Treo for less than $50 (I'm sure my Nokia 3360 is). For an additional $249-$329, you can get an Edge or an M500. Note that he didn't say that the combination would be lighter and smaller, just the phone.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by Toby
    Anywhere. It's easy to find a phone that's smaller and lighter than the Treo for less than $50 (I'm sure my Nokia 3360 is). For an additional $249-$329, you can get an Edge or an M500. Note that he didn't say that the combination would be lighter and smaller, just the phone.
    It's obviously been a while since I shopped phones. And the M500 you quote will even take a 16MB card, giving it more RAM than the Treo! (Edge is still only 8M)
    Jeff
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by PDAENVY
    It's obviously been a while since I shopped phones.
    The 3360s are pretty cool considering the price. They actually even have some limited PIM features (contact list can include 2 phone numbers and an email address for each person and there is a reminder function for appointments).
    And the M500 you quote will even take a 16MB card, giving it more RAM than the Treo! (Edge is still only 8M)
    I'm not sure if they're still running the promo, but at Christmas time, they were including a 16MB card, IIRC.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  6. #6  
    another pro:

    http://www.fortune.com/indexw.jhtml?...&doc_id=205944

    As for Mr. LANGBERG, he has a point. The Treo isn't for you if you want to stick it in your ear, Or if you want to carry a tablet pc.

    For those users who want one device that does both, this is the device for you.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  7. #7  
    i actually liked his review. it seemed very unbiased.

    as for the things you pulled out:

    1. he never said they were not selling the VP anymore. he said they were not manufacturing it any more. as the HS faq you quoted says, they don't mention manufacturing it anymore.

    2. yes, dubinsky just said 2003. however, up until she "just said" it, she had said summer. no doubt he's had the treo for a short while to review and was basing his article on info that HS itself had provided.

    3. his comment on the screen size: i haven't touched a treo yet, but i have no doubt the screen is too small. i find the m125 to be too small. however, it was something that i would have put up with for the benefits of a combined unit.

    mc
  8. #8  
    Instead of listening to people applaud the Treo or bash it for what it doesn't do ... I think someone should do a thorough side-by-side comparison of Treo and it's competitors (other hybrid pda/cell devices)!
  9. #9  
    Unless you use a headset, you talk on the Treo by holding the flipped-open cover against your ear and speaking into a microphone at the Treo's base. This puts your cheek in contact with both the screen and the inside of the window on the cover, causing both to get smeared by facial secretions and makeup.
    i don't know whether this guy is really fat or really stupid but my face has never even touched treo-s screen while talking (and this without any effort). actually i haven't even thought, that this could be a problem.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by MrKaarel


    i don't know whether this guy is really fat or really stupid but my face has never even touched treo-s screen while talking (and this without any effort). actually i haven't even thought, that this could be a problem.
    you'll notice he also mentioned make up, meaning the guy is thinking about the device in a broad spectrum (no pun intended)--thinking about users besides himself.

    another reason i trust this review more than the "gee, wow!" factor reviews.

    mc
  11. #11  
    The article is somewhat biased because of how is is doing the comparison - if you compare it to a PDA, the Treo is a bit small ... if you compare it to a cell phone, it's a bit too large ... if you compare the internet connection speed to a modem, it's too slow ... if you compare the qwerty keyboard to a standard one, it's way small.

    I want this guy to compare the Treo to Samsung's and/or Kyocera's hybrid ... OR for that matter any other hybrid by anyone else and THEN give me a fair evaluation.

    If he's so concerned with something so trivial as getting his oily skin on the screen, buy some PDA screen protectors ... cut them down to size ... and put one on the Treo's screen ... problem solved.

    Unfortnately he never makes the point that the Treo isn't for everyone ( all the other review admit this), only that it's not for him.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by arkitekt
    The article is somewhat biased because of how is is doing the comparison - if you compare it to a PDA, the Treo is a bit small ... if you compare it to a cell phone, it's a bit too large ... if you compare the internet connection speed to a modem, it's too slow ... if you compare the qwerty keyboard to a standard one, it's way small.
    i think that those comparisons make perfect sense. of course he's gonna compare it to a phone. it is a phone. and of course he's gonna compare it to a pda, because it's a pda too. and the things he likes about pdas and phones are not present in the treo. pointing this out is his job. believe it or not, they hired him for his opinion; not yours.


    I want this guy to compare the Treo to Samsung's and/or Kyocera's hybrid ... OR for that matter any other hybrid by anyone else and THEN give me a fair evaluation.
    why? maybe he thinks those phones are crap too. maybe he reviewed them when they came out. i'm sure handspring wants him to compare them also. because i have no doubt the treo is a better device. however, just because it's better than something else doesn't mean it's worth recommending.


    If he's so concerned with something so trivial as getting his oily skin on the screen, buy some PDA screen protectors ... cut them down to size ... and put one on the Treo's screen ... problem solved.
    i'd say that it's far from trivial if indeed it is a problem with the device. and your "solution" means that there will be goop on the screen protector. how is that a solution?


    Unfortnately he never makes the point that the Treo isn't for everyone ( all the other review admit this), only that it's not for him.
    again, he's not hired to give anyone's opinion but his own.

    mc
  13. #13  
    i'm sure handspring wants him to compare them also. because i have no doubt the treo is a better device
    yes ... you're correct, he's giving his opinion ... and i agree with your statement.
  14. #14  
    If it's true, as the article says, that you must have a seperate ISP to dial into in order to use the internet features of the Treo, then they DESERVE to get hammered.

    There is no excuse for the phone to be built this way - every major wireless carrier now has "wireless web" phones that allow you to use a microbrowser, email, etc. for nothing more than the cost of airtime.

    Since many users now have free nights and weekends, that makes the internet capabilities of such phones "free".

    The Treo, on the other hand, appears to use the older method where you make a data call into an ISP. This is SO DUMB. Cingular charges $4.95 a month, plus $0.15 A MINUTE for data calls. Then you must also add in the cost of a dialup ISP account which many people don't even have anymore.

    That right there is enough to kill off the Treo. Why would I pay fifteen cents a minute when I can get thousands of minutes free by using a different device?

    I hope to god the quoted article is wrong, because I really like the idea of the Treo.
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by jchristopher
    If it's true, as the article says, that you must have a seperate ISP to dial into in order to use the internet features of the Treo, then they DESERVE to get hammered.

    There is no excuse for the phone to be built this way - every major wireless carrier now has "wireless web" phones that allow you to use a microbrowser, email, etc. for nothing more than the cost of airtime.
    And how do you suppose "wireless web" works? It's simply by the phone's modem dialling into an ISP - but in those cases, typically the ISP is run by the network, and often a short code is used rather than a full number. Additionally, if the call doesn't go off-net, it can be end-to-end digital, making set up much faster.

    Data capable phones (with the exception of those that have always-on access via something like GPRS) all work like this.

    Of course you have to have an ISP of some sort to dial into to use the net features, but in many cases, that will be the network provider's own service. If they don't operate one, or you don't want to use it, then you can configure the Treo to work with something else.

    Maybe the person who wrote the piece was rather confused by having to enter information in the network prefs of PalmOS, rather than having it all set up on the phone for him when he took it out of the box.

    Nigel
  16. #16  
    Oh, I know how it works. The article specifically mentions dialing into Earthlink, implying it doesn't work with Cingular's service. Any outside data call is $4.95 a month and $0.15 a minute on Cingular Wireless, whereas data calls to their own wireless web service are "free", which is my point.

    If the Treo cannot use the network provider's service, as you call it, it will be a big problem. The phone should leverage the existing infrastructure, not require you to pay a seperate ISP and a per minute charge.

    One other thing - if your phone does not come configured to access their network, good luck getting Cingular to help you with it. Handspring better have these things setup in advance.
  17. #17  
    And how do you suppose "wireless web" works? It's simply by the phone's modem dialling into an ISP - but in those cases, typically the ISP is run by the network, and often a short code is used rather than a full number. Additionally, if the call doesn't go off-net, it can be end-to-end digital, making set up much faster.
    Nigel, Your argument makes absolutley no sense whatsoever. The point was that the Treo fails to correct the flaw of the Visorphone, in that you must dial-up an ISP in order to browse the Web. So rather than more tightly integrate the Treo with the service provider networks, Handspring copped out and left dial-up access the only way to browse the Web with a Treo, just as it did with the Visorphone.

    So if a Treo owner has AOL, DSL, or Cable Internet, they are sh*t out-of-luck. They will have to pay $10-20 a month EXTRA a month to access the Web with the Treo via another ISP. The question is why didn't Handspring allow the Treo to surf the web via Voicestreams' or Cingular's Wireless Web service?!! It must be due to poor integration. Perhaps they feel they can get by with such a jerry-rigged Web system until their GPRS patch is released for the Treo.

    You mentioned the benefits yourself of the advantages of using the service provider's Wireless Web service. Connection to the Net is much faster than having to burn the 1-2 cell/data minutes to handshake with an ISP! Not to mention, as noted previously, that surfing via the provider's own Wireless Web service can be done out of regular peak/off-peak voice minutes. This is a design flaw in the Treo that cannot be argued.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by RedSoxPDAer
    Your argument makes absolutley no sense whatsoever. The point was that the Treo fails to correct the flaw of the Visorphone, in that you must dial-up an ISP in order to browse the Web. So rather than more tightly integrate the Treo with the service provider networks, Handspring copped out and left dial-up access the only way to browse the Web with a Treo, just as it did with the Visorphone.
    It makes perfect sense, if you understand the technology. In a GSM network, prior to GPRS, all access is done via dial-up. What else do you imagine a WAP phone is doing? It's dialling up behind the scenes.

    The difference is that WAP or web enabled phones will typically be pre-configured by the network before being sold. But you can usually find out the details you need; I have the latest What Mobile here, with all the settings you need for any UK network.

    You mentioned the benefits yourself of the advantages of using the service provider's Wireless Web service. Connection to the Net is much faster than having to burn the 1-2 cell/data minutes to handshake with an ISP![...]This is a design flaw in the Treo that cannot be argued.
    Any my point is that YOU'RE STILL DIALING SOMETHING UP. Exactly the same process is going on behind the scenes in a WAP phone. The only difference is that the call is end-to-end digital, which you can do with the VP. It is not a flaw in the VP, or in the Treo.

    Come to London and I'll show you VP accessing exactly the same service, on-net, digital, as a WAP phone.

    It seems that what you're doing (and people who complain that there's no voicemail indicator on the VP) is blaming Handspring for the clueless and half-witted behaviour of the US GSM networks.

    Nigel.
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by nwhitfield
    [...] clueless and half-witted behaviour of the US GSM networks.
    It would be fairer to say North American, because Nortel is partly responsible too.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  20. #20  
    Incidentally, those who are determined to believe the VP and Treo can't do end-to-end digital calls, which may (but not necessarily) be needed for on-net wireless services can check with the AT+CBST=? command, to which VP responds

    +CBST: (0-7,12,14,65,66,68,70,71,75),(0,2),(0-1)

    The first section indicates autobaud, or speeds from 300 to 9600v32, 14400 v34

    Speeds 65,66,68,70,71 and 75 are for digital calls using v110 at up to 14,400 bps

    0,2 means VP can make either asynchronous data circuit calls, or async PAD calls

    The final option indicates either transparent or non-transparent mode.

    This is from the VisorPhone I have here; I can't really see any reason why they'd remove such features from Treo...

    Nigel.
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