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  1.    #1  
    http://199.97.97.16/contWriter/cndla...t_nytimes.html



    Has anyone seen (taken pictures) of the graveyard of devices that never were?
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  2. #2  
    I'd love to see the graveyard.

    The article is very interesting about the development of Treo.

    from the article:
    Along a corridor on the second floor, foam core and cardboard prototypes reveal the progression of its handheld devices - screens oriented vertically and horizontally, antennas hidden and stubby, different constellations of buttons, convex versus concave shapes, and other what might have beens.
    I do have to wonder why the stubby antenna won out over the hidden antenna. I have yet to own a hidden antenna phone, but I know several people who love not having something sticking out to catch on something in their pocket or bag.

    Patterns emerged: Users preferred using the phone one-handed and often would try to drive, without using their hands, while juggling the PDA, stylus and phone.

    What surprised her most was just how much people distracted themselves with their devices while driving.
    Um - yeah.... that's why so many mobile phones have voice dialing these days. My guess is that Handspring will realize this is a nice, useful feature and future Treo's will have it.

    The measure of a device is not just how much it stands out, but also how well it fits in, Hawkins said.
    At the airport a few months ago, Hawkins hid behind a post while making a call on the Treo, covering the device with his hand like a ``secret agent.''

    Feeling a bit silly, he stepped into the open and continued talking.

    ``No one noticed, which is great,'' Hawkins said. ``I wanted to see if the Treo was acceptable as a cell phone.''
    That's funny. I use my VisorPhone all over and I've rarely had anyone seem to notice (I could be totally oblivious). I think people are used to there being so many devices these days that they just aren't going to notice what your mobile phone looks like (unless they need to use it - I've noticed that if I lend someone my VisorPhone, it often takes a bit of coaching).
  3. #3  
    I wonder which service Jeff was using when making the call?

    Also as a side note to "voice dialing" this is service dependent because the voice dialing is resident on the system and not the phone per se. AT&T doesn't have voice dialing on any of their phones they simply do not support the service. I believe that the actual voice dialing is handled by a recorder at the home station because Sprint's voice dialing only works within the "home" area and not outside this normal range.

    Can anyone further enlighten me on this issue but while I had the I300 - the voice dialing wasn't worth the trouble in my mind so I'll still by a 270 when it becomes available through AT&T
    Moose Man
    Welcome my son, welcome to the machine.
    iPhone 3G, Treo 750, 680, 650, 600 and T5, T3, T, M515, M505, Vx, V, Prizm, Visor, IIIc, IIIe, Palm Pilot Professional, Palm Pilot (ok boys and girls a whopping 128k of memory - those were the days) and former Palm Beta tester.
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    Also as a side note to "voice dialing" this is service dependent because the voice dialing is resident on the system and not the phone per se.
    It doesn't have to be, and there are many GSM phones out there that support it on the phone, from a range of companies. I even have an old Philips Spark that I bought over 5 years ago which supports voice dialling.

    Some networks provide this sort of functionality, but it's far more common for the phones to do it. Newer models also support voice control for a range of features, like swapping profiles, or accessing WAP services.

    Nigel.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    I wonder which service Jeff was using when making the call?

    Also as a side note to "voice dialing" this is service dependent because the voice dialing is resident on the system and not the phone per se. AT&T doesn't have voice dialing on any of their phones they simply do not support the service. I believe that the actual voice dialing is handled by a recorder at the home station because Sprint's voice dialing only works within the "home" area and not outside this normal range.

    Can anyone further enlighten me on this issue but while I had the I300 - the voice dialing wasn't worth the trouble in my mind so I'll still by a 270 when it becomes available through AT&T
    I was under the impression that voice dialing on the I300 was independent of the service. There are 20 entries one can program on the device and if you do a hard reset, you lose them and must reprogram them unless you do a sync and restore. To me, this indicates that voice dialing is independent of the serivce. Sprint, on the other hand, has a $5/month service option where you dial *talk (or something like that) and you are connected to the service and then you can say who you want to call. That voice dialing is definitely network dependent.

    Marty
  6. #6  
    I know in order to use the voice dialing with Sprint, I had to pay the monthly access for it, but mmendo1 you are correct about "'losing" all of the voice dials during a hard reset. I thought that even if you restored after, no - I know that even after a restore the voice dials were gone and weren't backed up but I haven't had the phone for over a month so memory may have failed me.

    I do remember though that as soon as you hit the voice activation dial button you got this "connection" to the network because of the blip on the phone and the annoying voice that sounded just like every other voice that Sprint uses on their network.

    Does Verizon have voice dialing? and if so is their a monthly fee.

    I don't want to mis-inform but to me - if you have to pay a monthly fee for voice dialing then it's service dependent and if not it may be resident on the phone.

    It's interesting that AT&T doesn't offer it and its not available on any of the phones that I looked at recently so it may be a combination of things.

    Regardless, I my real question of what service Jeff Hawkins was using is still a mystery.
    Moose Man
    Welcome my son, welcome to the machine.
    iPhone 3G, Treo 750, 680, 650, 600 and T5, T3, T, M515, M505, Vx, V, Prizm, Visor, IIIc, IIIe, Palm Pilot Professional, Palm Pilot (ok boys and girls a whopping 128k of memory - those were the days) and former Palm Beta tester.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    I know in order to use the voice dialing with Sprint, I had to pay the monthly access for it,
    Sprint phones have two different flavors of voice dialing:

    1) certain phones (mainly samsung) can store a handful (usu less than 20...) of names on the phone itself, and associate those sounds with numbers.

    2) all of the phones can access "voice command," which is essentially a big A$$ system that does for everybody what certain phones can do for individuals--only you get more names & pay for it monthly.

    I've never used voice command... but the idea seems kinda half-baked to me.... aren't we doing our best to not have to reenter our contact information in multiple places?
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by dietrichbohn


    I've never used voice command... but the idea seems kinda half-baked to me.... aren't we doing our best to not have to reenter our contact information in multiple places?
    I agree and on the I300 it didn't work for beans in my mind - you had to remember how you saved the name you were dialing and exactly at that. Took less time to graffiti stroke and tap then hitting the button then calling the name exactly as I couldn't remember it.

    If I'm so pressed for "time" that I have to use voice dial then just take me out and shoot me because my life is meaningless. It took a fair amount of time to set up and then if your in your car, which is the only time that I see a big "savings", it wouldn't recognize it because of the background noise, my personal experiences.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm all for technology but this "option" just isn't for me, yet.
    Moose Man
    Welcome my son, welcome to the machine.
    iPhone 3G, Treo 750, 680, 650, 600 and T5, T3, T, M515, M505, Vx, V, Prizm, Visor, IIIc, IIIe, Palm Pilot Professional, Palm Pilot (ok boys and girls a whopping 128k of memory - those were the days) and former Palm Beta tester.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    If I'm so pressed for "time" that I have to use voice dial then just take me out and shoot me because my life is meaningless. It took a fair amount of time to set up and then if your in your car, which is the only time that I see a big "savings", it wouldn't recognize it because of the background noise, my personal experiences.
    On my Nokia 8210 (8290 is the similar US GSM1900 model) voice dialling is very simple, and pretty reliable, except with really short names - for example "Lisa" is a tough one for it, but "Home" or "Tiny" or "Mother" work just fine.

    Choose the 'voice tag' option, say it once, it's played back and saved. Then just hold down one key for a couple of seconds and speak after the beep. Works fine in the car via hands free for names recorded while I was at home, with the exception of Lisa; to be fair, the manual does say that really short names won't work well.

    Combined with the one touch speed dials on keys 2-8 (1 is voicemail), I've got most of my key contacts there reachable without even looking at the phone when I'm driving.

    Nigel.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    If I'm so pressed for "time" that I have to use voice dial then just take me out and shoot me because my life is meaningless. It took a fair amount of time to set up and then if your in your car, which is the only time that I see a big "savings", it wouldn't recognize it because of the background noise, my personal experiences.
    I use voice dialing on my T28 - and it is a function of my phone, not the wireless network. It works well for me in the car, which is really the only time I use it. It doesn't save me time so much, but it means I don't have to look at or handle the phone to dial for the numbers I've recorded voice labels on. It also speaks the voice lablels back to me when someone whose name I've recorded calls. So, if Brett calls from his mobile phone, I hear "Brett Mobile" in my ear and I say "answer" and I am speaking with Brett.

    It isn't a make-or-break feature for me (obviously, since I use the visorphone most of the time now). It really is funny to me that one of the Treo design consultants pointed out how much time people who are driving spend handling their phones, but chose not to include something that would simplify calling while driving.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    I know in order to use the voice dialing with Sprint, I had to pay the monthly access for it, but mmendo1 you are correct about "'losing" all of the voice dials during a hard reset. I thought that even if you restored after, no - I know that even after a restore the voice dials were gone and weren't backed up but I haven't had the phone for over a month so memory may have failed me.
    You have to be using Palm Desktop 4.01 in order to backup the voice dial entries on the I300 during a hotsync. I don't have the Sprint voicedial option setup on my account but I do still use the builtin voice dialing feature on my I300 (20 entries). It works just fine, outdoors, indoors, in the car, etc. Simply push the button on the left hand side of the phone (or the button on the earpiece of the optional headset), you get a prompt asking who you would like to call, speak, and the call goes through.

    Marty
  12. #12  
    It's beating a dead horse at this point, but voice dialing on the Kyocera QCP-6035 is resident in the phone, not the service.

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