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  1.    #1  
    Samsung - Sprint PCS - Palm Device

    This thing looks much better, is color, and is available today! It's also cheaper than the color treo which isn't due for another 7 months. Granted - no onboard keyboard - but the biggest deal about the treo is integrated phone.

    Samsung has made a much nicer package here than either the VDX with phone module, or the upcoming Treo - and it's already available for one of the nations largest phone networks! From what I've heard - the retail outlets can't keep this thing on the shelf.

    Why doesn't anyone talk about this device?
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by jradi
    Samsung - Sprint PCS - Palm Device

    Why doesn't anyone talk about this device?
    It is ugly?
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  3. #3  
    I've seen the Samsung device, and it's fairly big. Personally, I think it's ugly too. I think the keyboard on the Treo will appeal to users because (believe it or not) many Palm OS users don't know how to use graffiti.
    Million Dollar Bills, anyone?

    <a href="http://www.millionbill.com">www.MillionBill.com</a>
  4.    #4  
    I guess it's true what they say - eye of the beholder...

    I personally think the treo is ugly - fat and stocky - whereas the samsung is very sleek...
  5. #5  
    I own the I300 and it is anything but an ugly device! Its sides are contoured and it fits nicely in your hand and in your pocket (so obviously it is not that big)! The I300 is about the size of your average candy-bar style cell phone, roughly the size of a Nokia 51xx/61xx series phone. Granted those aren't the smallest phones but they certainly aren't big! The I300 is a very sleek device and I constantly get comments from strangers asking what it is and how cool it looks. The main disadvantage that people mention most is the lack of a hard keypad. Instead, the I300 uses a virtual keypad that is basically just another application in the Palm. But the phone application is very well integrated with the Palm and you can do things like dial straight from your address book and whatnot. Voice-activated dialing also helps to lessen the effect of not having a hard keypad. Bottom line, one handed dialing is easily accomplished with the I300. But some people do like the nonexistence of the hard keypad, makes the phone lighter, one thing less to break, and one less thing to get in the way.

    And something I don't see talked about much is that the Treo will initially only be available for GSM networks. While they may be good for international travelers or people who stay almost always in major metropolitan areas, I know I won't be purchasing one until a CDMA version comes out or GSM coverage improves considerably. Treo isn't dual band either. If it was, I might be able to live with the limited GSM coverage.

    But the I300 is the king of smartphones right now (makes the Kyocera 6035 look like the brick it is). When the Treo comes out, that may change but for people who are in areas where GSM coverage is lacking and/or want a color screen, the I300 will still be an excellent choice, especially when the price starts to really drop in a couple of months.

    Marty
  6. #6  
    hmm - I myself when I saw the samsung I300 at COMDEx, was severly disapointed. While much betterthan the kyrocera, this thing IMHO sucked. Let me jsut say though that I looked at it about 10 mitnues after I aws playing with da treo - so thigns like weight - the samsung one felt like 10 pounds (though it's onyl what, 8 oz) very disapointing. I agree that it was ugly, and also the screen was horrible. (washed out)

    Wheather or not my opinions are valid, and even though I don't have time to througly explain everytihng (sorry folks)... the treo is better than the samsung..

    Did you know that the treo 270 even with it's ridiculous price will bethe exact same size as the 180?
    -Michael Ducker
    TreoCentral Staff
  7. #7  
    I'm with Jradi, and mmendo1

    The Samsung I300 is the best. Yes I too have one and unless you have used it consistantly one cannot appreciate its beauty and character.
    I also have a VPL and would not give that up for the world, simply because of its expandabilty. I currently have the 16MB Memory Module permanently in use.

    To comment on a few of the comments

    1. As to the onboard Virtual keypad I think that was the greatest idea. I can maually touch the screen for the number that I want to place; as well as voice dial and speed dial etc.

    2. As to the washed out screen. It is far superior to my VPL. I can control the brightness and contrast to set it at whatever level I wish.

    3. As to GSM I think that IF it takes off in the US, it will not be for another 4-5 yrs. By then who knows what will be available.

    4. I can't say the treo is ugly but I do feel it is fat and stocky.

    5. The last comment I want to make is the size of the screen. The I300 is just a touch smaller than my VPL. I have no problem using the wireless web option. I constantly am going to the web to check stocks etc. The Blazer browser which comes with the I300 (actually its a CD instalation) is first in its class. I can view everything I want with no problems or crowding.
    It appears to me that the Treo screen is about half the size of the I300 screen. Now that I think will make thinks very hard if you go to the internet often.

    This is what you need to see the Treo screen. I found this on another thread credit goes to Culo 77 http://discussion.visorcentral.com/v...?postid=131256
    Ok that's it for now
    Last edited by katavia; 12/01/2001 at 12:05 AM.
  8. #8  
    Having no direct experience with either phone, I have to go on sight: I prefer the Treo.

    The Treo is less than half an inch wider than the I300, but more than half an inch shorter, and a tad thinner (Treo: 4.3" x 2.7" x .7"; I300: 4.9" x 2.28" x .82"). Handpring's site has pictures of the Treo next to a Visor Pro, a credit card, and a deck of playing cards for a more graphic demonstration. I wish Sprint would do the same with the I300.

    The alpha keypad is what sells it for me, though. Having used a Blackberry, there's no question that the hard keyboard is ideal for text messaging. I expect that it's also better for dialing, since you can access anyone's number in a couple of keystrokes by punching in the first letters of the callee's name -- more intuitive than memorizing a bunch of presets.

    I also like the windowed flip cover that protects the screen while keeping the display visible. Overall, I think the physical design of the Treo is way cooler than the I300. The Treo's speakerphone is also a big draw for me.

    I only wish Cingular (the GSM provider for VisorPhone in my area) had rate plans that are anywhere close to competitive with Sprint PCS.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by miradu2000
    I agree that it was ugly, and also the screen was horrible. (washed out)

    Wheather or not my opinions are valid, and even though I don't have time to througly explain everytihng (sorry folks)... the treo is better than the samsung..

    I disagree on the screen being washed out. Moving the constrast slider to the right does absolute wonders for the screen. The screen is no Prism but I do prefer it over the m505 and its still useable outdoors in sunlight. The silver face on the I300 makes it look very sharp IMO, definitely not ugly.

    I think the Treo does a better job of integrating everything together than the Samsung I300 BUT the Treo will initially only be available in b/w, a major drawback for me and its not even available now. Personally, I've grown quite accustomed to color and reverting to b/w is simply not acceptable so the Samsung I300 is my only choice, and not a bad one at that (dual-band as well). Sure you don't get a qwerty keyboard and its a little bigger, but its here NOW, its in color, and it does a pretty good job of intergrating a palm, phone, and a wireless data device (though not perfefct). As far as the wieght goes, the Samsung device is listed at 6 ounces while the Treo at 5.4 ounces. And like I said in my previous post, the lack of GSM coverage in the US (although constantly expanding/upgrading) along with no analog fallback on the Treo makes the Treo a nonoption for me. Until GSM coverage improves drastically or HS releases a CDMA version, I won't be able to bring myself to fork over $600 for a phone that I won't be able to use all the time. (If I lived in Europe, I'd pick up the 270 in a heartbeat.)

    Marty
    Last edited by mmendo1; 12/06/2001 at 04:45 PM.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by Gameboy70
    The alpha keypad is what sells it for me, though. Having used a Blackberry, there's no question that the hard keyboard is ideal for text messaging. I expect that it's also better for dialing, since you can access anyone's number in a couple of keystrokes by punching in the first letters of the callee's name -- more intuitive than memorizing a bunch of presets.

    I also like the windowed flip cover that protects the screen while keeping the display visible. Overall, I think the physical design of the Treo is way cooler than the I300. The Treo's speakerphone is also a big draw for me.

    I only wish Cingular (the GSM provider for VisorPhone in my area) had rate plans that are anywhere close to competitive with Sprint PCS.
    I do think the design/size of the Treo is superior to that of the I300 but the I300 is not without its advantages as well.

    One-handed dialing is easily accomplished on the I300 w/o the use of speed dial. You can scroll through your address book with arrow buttons on the side of the phone, highlight the name of interest, and push a button next to the arrow buttons to call the number, all with one hand. Very easy/quick as long as your address book isn't too big. If you don't want to do that, simply access one of the 20 voice dial entries Samsung has provided on the phone with the push of a button no matter if you're in the phone or palm side of the device.

    The I300 also has a speakerphone that is very clear and can be very loud if you turn the volume up high enough.

    Something I forgot to mention in my other post was that the I300 has a top LCD so you can see who is calling, see if you have any messages waiting, as well as monitor battery/signal strength, all without taking it off of your side. Very useful feature!

    Marty
  11.    #11  
    I still like the samsung - but may be switching camps.

    I didn't realize how small the treo was - I thought it was a VDX - with a cover slapped over it - it looks closer to a Startac sized? Maybe a little taller and wider - but still smaller than a VDX - not bad...

    Here's a question for you Samsung owners - emailed this to Handspring today - but am wondering if samsung may have already implemented this feature...

    - - - -

    Treo - Ringer Idea

    Everyday someone forgets to put their phone on vibrate in a meeting. It's very annoying, and embarassing (as upset with other people as I get - I have to admit, it's happened to me a few times).

    Why should I have to remember all the time - when my phone should remember for me!

    I forwarded this idea to Motorola, but I think you guys could implement it faster - maybe even get it in for your FCS.

    I would like to be able to set ringer/vibrate/mute through software. With timer programable.

    Example:
    Default: Ringer
    M-F 8am-5pm - Vibrate

    or

    Default: Ringer
    M-F 10pm-5am - Mute

    The treo could actually take this one step further! A small checkbox in my scheduler - so when I make an appointment - one of my options could be to have the ringer set for mute or vibrate. Then my phone would always be on ringer - but appointments default to vibrate!

    I love this idea - and I think it would be something totally new to the market.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by jradi
    Treo - Ringer Idea
    hot diggidy, I love it!
  13. #13  
    The tech section ("Tech Times) of the Los Angeles Times had a good article/review on the Treo yesterday and makes a few comparisons to the Kyocera and to the I300.

    http://www.latimes.com/technology/cu...2Dtech%5Ftimes
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by jradi
    Here's a question for you Samsung owners - emailed this to Handspring today - but am wondering if samsung may have already implemented this feature...
    Samsung haven't, but the latest Nokia GSM handsets, like the 8310, do have the ability to switch profiles at pre-arranged times.

    Nigel.
  15. #15  
    After reading all the above I still think the Treo will need some improvement. I still feel it has 3 major drawbacks
    1. GSM
    2. I lke the smaller size of the treo but I think the screen size is too small to be usefull for Browsing
    3. A quote from the la times sums it up
    " In addition, both of the Treo's dialing keypads--whether on the tiny keyboard or displayed on the touch screen--omit the familiar letters found on wired phones as well as on most mobile phones.

    That may seem like an unimportant detail, but think about how many times you end up dialing a phone number using the keypad letters (1-800-I FLY SWA for Southwest Airlines or 1-800-FLOWERS, for example). Think about the many thousands of company phone systems that ask you to use the phone keypad to spell out the name of the employee you want to reach.

    Unless you can remember that the number 5 represents the letters JKL and 7 is PQRS, all those dial-by-spelling systems become unusable"
  16. #16  
    A picture of the Treo on HS's website clearly shows the virtual keypad with the appropriate letters displayed on the appropriate number key. Maybe this is an issue HS has since fixed and his unit was an earlier one.

    Marty
  17. Ginmtb's Avatar
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    #17  
    This was posted in the LA Times article:

    FOR THE RECORD

    Handspring Treo--A story about Handspring's new Treo device in Tech Times on Thursday incorrectly implied there is no easy way to dial letter-based phone numbers. The Treo's keypad does not include the familiar letters commonly found on phone dialing pads, but the device displays them on the touch-screen phone buttons.
  18. #18  
    Business Week Online has a new review of the Treo.

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine...1/b3762059.htm

    Very positive overall.
  19.    #19  
    Originally posted by nwhitfield


    Samsung haven't, but the latest Nokia GSM handsets, like the 8310, do have the ability to switch profiles at pre-arranged times.

    Nigel.
    Man, those little Nokia phones are amazing! I wonder why they don't sell them in the US?? I had to go to the Europe nokia page to read about the 6250 and 9310!!

    Built in FM Radio
    Scheduler
    Timed Profiles
    To Do List
    Sound Meter
    Games
    Automatic Volume Control
    Calendar
    Predictive Text Input (which I've played with, and works amazingly well)
    Voice Dialing AND Voice Commands
    Currency Converter
    Calculator
    Stop Watch
    Countdown Timer

    If I could buy one of these - I might actually consider leaving SprintPCS and my trusty Motorola Startac (2 years of faithful service and counting).
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by jradi
    Man, those little Nokia phones are amazing! I wonder why they don't sell them in the US??
    Well, all the best features do seem to appear on the GSM phones, and the likes of the 8310 and 6250 are straight GSM 900/1800, which is the two most common frequencies for the largest market.

    You might get some versions, eventually - usually the last two digits of the model number indicate the standards supported. I think 90 is for GSM1900, and 50 is some weird US standard.

    Sadly, when it comes to cellphones, you're a small market, and I guess they think it's not worth the time and effort developing the really good phones. More widespread deployment of GSM in the US would help, but even then, it has to have a different model for the 1900MHz frequency, since Nokia don't seem terribly keen on making tri-band phones.

    I'm not entirely sure why that is; Motorola do a lot of tri-band, which is the only reason most GSM users would touch one of their handsets. But even then, you have to manually select US or rest of the world operation. I don't know if that's to do with some jurisdictions not being happy with phones broadcasting on non-permitted frequencies. But with a standard GSM 900/1800 phone, you don't need to do anything - the phone will search both bands, and on a dual-band network can even hand off transparently between two adjacent cells on different frequencies.

    N.
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