Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1.    #1  
    Marc Cuban is keeping a whole computer running just so he could have access to his old data:
    http://www.blogmaverick.com/2007/09/16/once-you-go-mac/


    I'm similarly weighed down by my old data:

    I've wasted a good part of this weekend trying to get my new Mac to sync with my Treo so I could keep all the data I've accumulated on it over the years. I can't help thinking there must be a better way.

    Because I keep so much data on my Treo (thousands of contacts, appointments, etc), every time I upgrade anything that touches my Treo I find myself wasting several days and tons of money keeping it all together.

    When I upgraded to Act 2007, I spent hours trying to sync Act's data with the Treo and couldn't make it work. I felt like I read these forums from cover to cover and couldn't come up with anything. A friend who does Act support finally told me to give it up and buy CompanionLink. Which I did and everything worked.

    Now I switched to a Mac and I'm having a hell of a time trying to get my data to work properly. I was smart enough to buy the missing sync right away and I event paid for MarkSpace's tech support. But I'm still slaving away. My calendar's database must be corrupt because I can't get it to sync up no matter what I do. (It won't even sync with my old PC.)

    Also, I discovered that Macs don't sync up custom fields. Most of my contacts' records have 2 custom fields: how I met them & what I should invite them to. Mac's Address Book has no way of handling that. To retrieve and use that data, I have to get a program called Soho Organizer--a monster of a program for 2 simple fields.

    This is a mess and a waste of time.

    I got a Treo, and Act! and everything else to save time and be more efficient. But I'm finding they're making me less efficient.

    What's the answer to all this?

    - Should we only use universal formats? (Maybe I should refuse to use Palm's proprietary memo format in favor of txt, which can be read anywhere.)

    - Should we we go back to basics? (I laughed at people who used a spreadsheet for an address book, but maybe that's the best way to do things.)

    - Should we only use Web-based apps? (Though Web-based apps tend to lock us in too. I can't move my Facebook contacts anywhere, for example. And they're undependable. I hate limiting my work to places that have wi-fi.)

    - Should we delete more? (In his book, Bit Litiracy, Mark Hurst says we should delete all data that we're done with. But I'm never done with data. I often search old emails for current work.)
  2. #2  
    I try to delete old email that has no real purpose on a regular basis. I delete any appointments and tasks that are completed.

    But on my laptop, it's another story. Too many duplicate or old files I never or barely use. I'll be cleaning that out too one of these days.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    I try to delete old email that has no real purpose on a regular basis. I delete any appointments and tasks that are completed.

    But on my laptop, it's another story. Too many duplicate or old files I never or barely use. I'll be cleaning that out too one of these days.
    Yes, that's another issue. I have too many files. Sorting them out takes too long, so I just keep 'em all in a big messy folder.

    But the bigger issue is accessibility. I can't get at some of my files because they're on my cell and they need to be synced. Cuban can't get at some of his files because a mac program (entourage) can't read a PC program (Outlook)--even though both programs are created by the same company.

    Everyone reading these boards is saving lots of important information in their Treos. How much of that will they have access to if they move to a Blackberry, or even a new Palm device?

    I think much of it will be lost. And figuring out a way to move that data is going to take them forever. And I bet you much of their data will be lost.
  4. #4  
    One should never delete anything, unless you want to eradicate the data. Duplication just means redundancy, and the various desktop search tools make all the information accessible no matter where it is. Even if the format is not immediately accessible, unless its extremely obscure there will always be a way to read it in the future.

    Eventually our desktops will become just like the internet, where nothing is ever truly lost.

    Surur
  5. #5  
    Until your hard drive crashes and you have no backup.
  6. #6  
    Aint that the truth!


    Quote Originally Posted by samkim View Post
    Until your hard drive crashes and you have no backup.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim View Post
    Until your hard drive crashes and you have no backup.
    Thats where redundancy comes in. When I upgrade my HDD I make the original the slave of the old one, and dont delete anything from it. It becomes a spinning archive of the state before the backup. In addition I have 4 active computers (1 desktop and 3 laptops) and my stuff is spread out and duplicated pretty much all over it.

    It would take a nuclear bomb to cause me to lose everything

    Surur
  8. #8  
    When I was moving from my Palm OS Treo to WM, I considered all these factors. My solution was to use cross-platform formats whenever possible. All of my PIM data is exportable to csv.

    I use an online bookmarking tool and RSS site that allow easy export in a widely accepted format.

    I use txt files instead of proprietary formats, and all of my music is in MP3 even though I know there are other more compressed higher quality formats available.

    I use stocks and DB apps that allow export to csv. If I see an app that uses proprietary formats, I look for an alternative app that has an export function as well (Thank you Splash Data for SplashMoney's export function).

    The last piece of the puzzle is StyleTap. It allows me to run old Palm apps on my WinMo treo and is a dream come true.
    A new Avatar to commemorate Silly Season.
  9. #9  
    I just read the article and realized that this is really about Cuban moving to a Mac. The title "We need a new way to deal with the burden of too much data" threw me off. It's really about the incompatabilty of the two platforms.

    He does have too much data. 10 yr old emails really need to go, but his main point was really about how great Mac is.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    I just read the article and realized that this is really about Cuban moving to a Mac. The title "We need a new way to deal with the burden of too much data" threw me off. It's really about the incompatabilty of the two platforms.

    He does have too much data. 10 yr old emails really need to go, but his main point was really about how great Mac is.
    And the message really then is, to preserve your data, stay in the mainstream

    Surur
  11. #11  
    The mainstream often sucks. Just because the crowd does something doesn't mean you have to do it too.

    Actually I think the article is different from this thread. This thread is about how to move large amounts of possibly incompatible data. I'm going to guess that the one part about not being able to access 10 yrs. of email and Outlook files is what got the OP thinking.

    But honestly, that's just out of hand IMO. 10 yr. old email and Outlook files likely have out of date info. You want to move to a new computer, be it Mac or Windows, just move what's necessary IMO. It's like moving clutter to a brand new apartment otherwise!

    Also before moving to any new format, RESEARCH about how to get your data working. It's a known fact that Mac and PC are often incompatible. One reason I couldn't move to Mac several years ago is certain programs weren't available for Mac but now they are, so the move wouldn't be so painful now.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    And the message really then is, to preserve your data, stay in the mainstream

    Surur
    Nah. If you want to preserve data and you aren't in the mainstream . . . learn to keep up!
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM
  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by skfny View Post
    When I was moving from my Palm OS Treo to WM, I considered all these factors. My solution was to use cross-platform formats whenever possible. All of my PIM data is exportable to csv.

    I use an online bookmarking tool and RSS site that allow easy export in a widely accepted format.

    I use txt files instead of proprietary formats, and all of my music is in MP3 even though I know there are other more compressed higher quality formats available.

    I use stocks and DB apps that allow export to csv. If I see an app that uses proprietary formats, I look for an alternative app that has an export function as well (Thank you Splash Data for SplashMoney's export function).

    The last piece of the puzzle is StyleTap. It allows me to run old Palm apps on my WinMo treo and is a dream come true.

    I think this is the answer. To use any program out there, but never lock ourselves into a program that doesn't allow us to export our data into a universal format.

    The only problem with this is that some programs can't import all of our data. So, for example, it's great that Act! allows us to export our data into a .cvs format. But what happens when I can't find a program that can read all those extra fields?
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    The mainstream often sucks. Just because the crowd does something doesn't mean you have to do it too.

    Actually I think the article is different from this thread. This thread is about how to move large amounts of possibly incompatible data. I'm going to guess that the one part about not being able to access 10 yrs. of email and Outlook files is what got the OP thinking.

    But honestly, that's just out of hand IMO. 10 yr. old email and Outlook files likely have out of date info. You want to move to a new computer, be it Mac or Windows, just move what's necessary IMO. It's like moving clutter to a brand new apartment otherwise!

    Also before moving to any new format, RESEARCH about how to get your data working. It's a known fact that Mac and PC are often incompatible. One reason I couldn't move to Mac several years ago is certain programs weren't available for Mac but now they are, so the move wouldn't be so painful now.
    I think it's all necessary. Data storage is so cheap that it's hard to toss info out.

    What we need is easy ways to move it around. That way we're not locked into a proprietary format or device.
  15.    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    I just read the article and realized that this is really about Cuban moving to a Mac. The title "We need a new way to deal with the burden of too much data" threw me off. It's really about the incompatabilty of the two platforms.

    He does have too much data. 10 yr old emails really need to go, but his main point was really about how great Mac is.
    His point is that the mac is great, but he can't take his data to it, so now he's forced to keep a second computer around for it.

    But the bigger point has nothing to do with a Mac.

    It's that we need to be able to easily export and import all of our data when we switch devices/software/anything.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    One should never delete anything, ... Even if the format is not immediately accessible, unless its extremely obscure there will always be a way to read it in the future.
    ...
    Eventually our desktops will become just like the internet, where nothing is ever truly lost.
    I don't know where you get the idea that nothing on the Internet is ever truly lost... I know of a number of websites that have winked out of existence and there is no obvious way or clue that any of the (sometimes quite valuable) content will ever be accessible again. Two websites in particular, which I help set up about 10 years ago, that content is essentially gone forever... and I'm not talking about trivial content... but published magazines, medical information, etc.

    There are plenty of formats which are, in practical terms, not going to be ever retrievable... sure if you're willing to spend $$$$, it is *technically* possible, but it is essentially not ever going to happen. For example, I have quite a few 800 and 1600bpi magtapes (print-through has probably made them unreadable anyways), but such drives are practically gone. And 650Mb magneto-optical disks (I have dozens) -- no more drives to be had. And 8" floppies written in RT-11 format -- nope, DEC isn't even a company anymore. RK05 1.25Mb hard disks the size of a trashcan lid -- never will be read in the future. These formats are not/were not "extremely obscure"... then... but they are now...

    I have files that I created in 1974 that I still maintain copies of... so I do have some experience with longterm data storage... I still have emails from 1980. Yes, I do save all files that aren't clearly trash -- my personal filestore is something like 300GB (not including commercial software, or media like music or movies, but real personal data).
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by neurocutie View Post
    I don't know where you get the idea that nothing on the Internet is ever truly lost... I know of a number of websites that have winked out of existence and there is no obvious way or clue that any of the (sometimes quite valuable) content will ever be accessible again. Two websites in particular, which I help set up about 10 years ago, that content is essentially gone forever... and I'm not talking about trivial content... but published magazines, medical information, etc.

    There are plenty of formats which are, in practical terms, not going to be ever retrievable... sure if you're willing to spend $$$$, it is *technically* possible, but it is essentially not ever going to happen. For example, I have quite a few 800 and 1600bpi magtapes (print-through has probably made them unreadable anyways), but such drives are practically gone. And 650Mb magneto-optical disks (I have dozens) -- no more drives to be had. And 8" floppies written in RT-11 format -- nope, DEC isn't even a company anymore. RK05 1.25Mb hard disks the size of a trashcan lid -- never will be read in the future. These formats are not/were not "extremely obscure"... then... but they are now...

    I have files that I created in 1974 that I still maintain copies of... so I do have some experience with longterm data storage... I still have emails from 1980. Yes, I do save all files that aren't clearly trash -- my personal filestore is something like 300GB (not including commercial software, or media like music or movies, but real personal data).
    Of course physical media dies, which is why one needs to keep copying it. I just bought a new laptop with a 250 GB HDD. All my data will be copied onto there, creating another redundant copy.

    If you think the internet forget things, try releasing an embarrassing video

    Surur
  18.    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by neurocutie View Post
    I don't know where you get the idea that nothing on the Internet is ever truly lost... I know of a number of websites that have winked out of existence and there is no obvious way or clue that any of the (sometimes quite valuable) content will ever be accessible again. Two websites in particular, which I help set up about 10 years ago, that content is essentially gone forever... and I'm not talking about trivial content... but published magazines, medical information, etc.

    There are plenty of formats which are, in practical terms, not going to be ever retrievable... sure if you're willing to spend $$$$, it is *technically* possible, but it is essentially not ever going to happen. For example, I have quite a few 800 and 1600bpi magtapes (print-through has probably made them unreadable anyways), but such drives are practically gone. And 650Mb magneto-optical disks (I have dozens) -- no more drives to be had. And 8" floppies written in RT-11 format -- nope, DEC isn't even a company anymore. RK05 1.25Mb hard disks the size of a trashcan lid -- never will be read in the future. These formats are not/were not "extremely obscure"... then... but they are now...

    I have files that I created in 1974 that I still maintain copies of... so I do have some experience with longterm data storage... I still have emails from 1980. Yes, I do save all files that aren't clearly trash -- my personal filestore is something like 300GB (not including commercial software, or media like music or movies, but real personal data).
    That's right! I forgot about that. I have disks that I saved so carefully and moved from apartment to apartment. I'm probably never going to have access to them.

Posting Permissions