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  1.    #1  
    Did you guys see this??

    http://mytreo.net/archives/2007/08/l...lable-now.html

    Thoughts??
    Tina T
    MCP, MCSE, MCDBA, VCP

    Sharp Zaurus > Cassiopeia A-20 > Casio E-115 > Psion 3 > Phillips VELO 1 > Palm V > Treo 90 > Treo 300 > Treo 600 > Treo 650 > Treo 700p > Centro > Palm Pre > HTC Evo 4G > Samsung Epic 4G > HTC EVO 4G Shift & a rooted Nook Color!! (But still have nothing but love and hope for Palm)
  2. #2  
    does it support the phone capabilities of the treo?
    it seems not...
  3. doc31's Avatar
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    #3  
    No offensive to anyone but I want to ask the person who posted that article .......... What does an "Independent programmers in the community" have to do with palm launching a Linux mobile OS.
    I'm sure if the “Independent programmers in the community " actually worked in Palms labs they could have done this years ago. This signals no progress to me. Unless it’s from Palm I wouldn’t install it on my device that I use a daily base. On an old 650 fun maybe.
    I don't care what you say SPRINT kicks
    Treo650/Treo700p/Treo700wx/Treo755/HTC Touch/ Treo Pro/ Touch Pro/ Touch Diamond / Palm Pre / HTC EVO Shift / Nexus S 4G
    My Themes - Prethemer
  4. qb11g's Avatar
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    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc31 View Post
    No offensive to anyone but I want to ask the person who posted that article .......... What does an "Independent programmers in the community" have to do with palm launching a Linux mobile OS.
    I'm sure if the “Independent programmers in the community " actually worked in Palms labs they could have done this years ago. This signals no progress to me. Unless it’s from Palm I wouldn’t install it on my device that I use a daily base. On an old 650 fun maybe.
    I agree, but did you see Opie?! It seems pretty slick to me. I would try it if someone put out some instructions...and, of course, made me feel comforatable knowing that I wouldn't brick my device if I tried to stop running Linux.
  5. #5  
    It doesn't surprise me that the IPs got Linux on a Treo before Palm did. People have been working on that stuff for years now.
    I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by fleeing the scene of the accident!
  6. 1PTUser's Avatar
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    #6  
    Opie does look pretty nice. I may have a gsm 650 to try it on.... now where did I see it last? hmmnn. Someone provide instructions to get it loaded that NON-LINUX techies could follow and I'll have to find my former handheld buddy.
    Something old, something new. I got a ringer switch and 800W .
  7. #7  
    The hacker community will always come out with stuff before companies because they do not have to support it (I am not saying that to speak badly about the hacker community, it is great, trust me).

    The thing with that though, is at the moment (I have played with the Tungsten T3 version), there is no easy system to set it up. Users are pretty much on their own.

    It will evolve over time.
    Did you know:

    webOS ran on a Treo 800 during initial development.
  8. #8  
    There is no mention of support for Phone functions (for now) meaning no phone, no messaging, no email... And that is the crux of it all.

    Basically, it is all going the desktop Linux way, overall architecture that is confusing to lay people, nasty and inconsistent UI, bad GUI designed by people with less or no visual sense, emphaisis on idiotic stuff like ring-tones and wallpapers and overall sluggish performance/ user interaction.

    - mvk
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by KabukiAssassin View Post
    It doesn't surprise me that the IPs got Linux on a Treo before Palm did. People have been working on that stuff for years now.
    Actually, I doubt that the "IPs" got Linux on a Treo before Palm. Palm has had Linux running for a long time on a Treo, they just aren't going to release it until it is done. The IPs don't mind releasing stuff before it is done. And this is one case where that is true. They have released a "Technology Preview." I have played with it a bit. It is kinda cool, but it is also kinda slow and buggy, and lacks a lot of things. The average Palm user would be sorely disappointed.

    Palms job is a bit harder. They not only have to have Linux running on a Treo (not that difficult), but they have to enable compatibility with older Palm apps (more difficult), and they have to have to support it (much more difficult). All that means lots of coding, testing and debugging, working with 3rd party developers, more testing and debugging, more coding, etc.

    And after all that work is done, and the product ships, 90% of the posts about that device will be somebody complaining that it lacks features x, y, and z. Yet the "IPs" will be praised for releasing slow, buggy, feature lacking code like they are some kind of gods.

    Don't get me wrong. I'll be the first one to load up Linux on device X if possible, and "play" with it. But I also live in the real world, and when I want to get my work done, I'll reboot back into Palm OS (warts and all). Maybe in a year or two Opie will be stable enough on the Palm devices to actually use. It isn't right now. When it is, I'll consider it.
    The wise man breaks wind and is gone... - J. Tull
  10. emajy's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by paesano View Post
    Palms job is a bit harder. They not only have to have Linux running on a Treo (not that difficult), but they have to enable compatibility with older Palm apps (more difficult), and they have to have to support it (much more difficult).
    I would gladly forget about all my Palm legacy apps if they could release a stable Linux Treo. I think moving on is much better then supporting legacy applications.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by emajy View Post
    I would gladly forget about all my Palm legacy apps if they could release a stable Linux Treo. I think moving on is much better then supporting legacy applications.
    You might be happy with that, but I bet for each one of you, there will be 10 who won't be happy to give up the many apps they become accustomed to using and can't do without. I'm sure Palm will encourage as a many a possible to move on to native Linux apps, but that will take a long time. Meanwhile the question would be, which apps can you do without for now?

    The thing that makes the Treo (PalmOS) compelling to have is the large number of apps available for it. Far more than any other smart phone. It would be suicide for them not to support older legacy apps.
    The wise man breaks wind and is gone... - J. Tull
  12. #12  
    Legacy application compatibility is the main reason (one of them at least) why we don't move on to a WM Treo. That and not liking Microsoft.
    Visor Edge + VisorPhone -> Samsung i300 -> Treo 300 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Treo 755
  13. pump142's Avatar
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    #13  
    wat devices will it run on?
    M505 -> M515 -> Kyo6035 -> Kyo 7135 -> Treo 600 ->Treo 650 -> Treo 700P -> Treo 700 WX -> Samsung Saga VZW
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by pump142 View Post
    wat devices will it run on?
    I see that it seems to run on a TX. One of which has been sitting in my drawer for quite some time. Hm.

    I have the horrible high-pitched screen buzz on the thing, but it might be worth dealing with that to play around with this..
  15. #15  
    I finally got around to booting my 650 with instructions from here:
    Michael Sheldon's Stuff: http://blog.mikeasoft.com/2007/06/30...xin-ur-phonez/

    It is all very simple, really, and non-destructive too.

    What can I say, everything is there, but still... yes, the famous (and much desired ) Linux sluggishness is there, so that you know that you've booted in linux. Also, you better have very good eyesight if you want to tread this path.

    - mvk
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    I finally got around to booting my 650 with instructions from here:
    Michael Sheldon's Stuff: http://blog.mikeasoft.com/2007/06/30...xin-ur-phonez/

    It is all very simple, really, and non-destructive too.

    What can I say, everything is there, but still... yes, the famous (and much desired ) Linux sluggishness is there, so that you know that you've booted in linux. Also, you better have very good eyesight if you want to tread this path.

    - mvk
    Famous Linux Sluggishness? eh? Famous for this particular implimentation on the Treo? Otherwise, you're talking out the wrong end.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by khaytsus View Post
    Famous Linux Sluggishness? eh? Famous for this particular implimentation on the Treo? Otherwise, you're talking out the wrong end.
    It is well-known that Linux may be good for server applications but absolutely, definitely, un-conditionally stinks where user-interaction is concerned. (i.e., snappiness of response... a simple thing like typing out a letter can be frustrating, and a faster processor and more memory is not the solution, esp. where handhelds are concerned)

    And it is the same thing with the Linux build I tried out. Why is so necessary to put on so much eye-candy when the over all user experience is so sluggish?

    - mvk
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    It is well-known that Linux may be good for server applications but absolutely, definitely, un-conditionally stinks where user-interaction is concerned. (i.e., snappiness of response... a simple thing like typing out a letter can be frustrating, and a faster processor and more memory is not the solution, esp. where handhelds are concerned)

    And it is the same thing with the Linux build I tried out. Why is so necessary to put on so much eye-candy when the over all user experience is so sluggish?

    - mvk
    Seen the same thing on other implementations of Linux on PDAs. Perhaps it is just because Linux is really designed as a desktop application...therefore not optimized for mobil. The Iphone , which is Unix based, doesn't have slowness issues.

    Also, I'm not entirely confident Unix or Linux will save the Palm platform. Sharp tried this route with their Zaurus line and it never really was a hit. The only way it will work is if it is as transparent to the customer (like the Iphone) and bugfree.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    It is well-known that Linux may be good for server applications but absolutely, definitely, un-conditionally stinks where user-interaction is concerned. (i.e., snappiness of response... a simple thing like typing out a letter can be frustrating, and a faster processor and more memory is not the solution, esp. where handhelds are concerned)

    And it is the same thing with the Linux build I tried out. Why is so necessary to put on so much eye-candy when the over all user experience is so sluggish?

    - mvk
    Hmm.. I have a dual boot computer both at work and on my laptop. My desktop is dual boot Windows XP Professional and Linux Fedora Core 7. The Linux side is definitely NOT sluggish. The GUI is comparable to XP. I require the XP side to host applications needed in business that do not exist on Linux. I have mostly solved that problem with Crossover Office and, therefore, have not booted the XP side in about 3 months.

    On the laptop, I have installed Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Linux) and, again, Windows XP Professional. Once again, I finad the performance, appearance, and ease of use comparable between the two OSes. I would rate the Ubuntu distribution more user friendly in terms of installing, maintaining and upgrading software than either the Fedora Core 7 Linux or the Windows XP installation due to the use of the Debian apt software maintenance packages.

    I am wondering what systems you are using to base your Linux experience on. Your comments seem similar to those of Linux zealots who always say that "Windoze Bloze" without either using a properly configured and maintained system or when using the wrong computer hardware/software for the task at hand.

    That said, I think that the handheld platform requires a different type of OS than a desktop. Stripped down and/or optimized versions of Windows and/or Linux are obvious choices given the large developer bases available and the wealth of applications that can be adapted. Using a full blown desktop OS on a handheld is just asking for sluggish and inappropriate performance.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    It is well-known that Linux may be good for server applications but absolutely, definitely, un-conditionally stinks where user-interaction is concerned. (i.e., snappiness of response... a simple thing like typing out a letter can be frustrating, and a faster processor and more memory is not the solution, esp. where handhelds are concerned)

    And it is the same thing with the Linux build I tried out. Why is so necessary to put on so much eye-candy when the over all user experience is so sluggish?

    - mvk
    Obviously no point in arguing with you..

    It took me 5 minutes to slowly type out this message.. Oh the agony.
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