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  1.    #1  
    http://www.cellamericas.com/store/Ce...-pr-16246.html

    . It says it's for the sprint, tmobile, verison 1900mhz- (and possibly cingular on GRPS, etc)

    I was looking at this and wondering if we could make something ourselves?? Or a totally different MOD? For example, we know that a radar (or a satelite dish) uses a curved surface to "capture and point(reflect) the frequency back to the middle point"- can we make something like that and direct it at our offices?

    I can see it now... using an umberlla lined with tinfoil, in a corner, pointing it at my general area....

    Lance
    Last edited by aslmentor; 04/26/2007 at 01:40 PM.
  2. #2  
    I would rather rely on something like this, since it's common...
    http://www.spotwave.com/residential/index.asp
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by aslmentor View Post
    http://www.cellamericas.com/store/Ce...-pr-16246.html

    . It says it's for the sprint, tmobile, verison 1900mhz- (and possibly cingular on GRPS, etc)

    I was looking at this and wondering if we could make something ourselves?? Or a totally different MOD? For example, we know that a radar (or a satelite dish) uses a curved surface to "capture and point(reflect) the frequency back to the middle point"- can we make something like that and direct it at our offices?

    I can see it now... using an umberlla lined with tinfoil, in a corner, pointing it at my general area....

    Lance
    I like how it says it's for GSM yet says it works with Sprint and Verizon, which are CDMA. Right...
  4.    #4  
    If sprint is on 1900mhz, then it should work? (just wondering- as I dont have sprint)
    Lance
    http://www.aslmentor.com
    (my avatar means "I love you" in sign language.
    --------------------------
    PalmIII->Sidekick I-->Sidekick II -->Sidekick III and now Treo 750 which blows them all away.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by crazie.eddie View Post
    I would rather rely on something like this, since it's common...
    http://www.spotwave.com/residential/index.asp
    Their server seems to be busy right now, I'll check it later. thanks for the tip.
    Lance
    http://www.aslmentor.com
    (my avatar means "I love you" in sign language.
    --------------------------
    PalmIII->Sidekick I-->Sidekick II -->Sidekick III and now Treo 750 which blows them all away.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by aslmentor View Post
    If sprint is on 1900mhz, then it should work? (just wondering- as I dont have sprint)
    No, it won't work. GSM and CDMA are different types of networks. They may have the same frequency, but if the booster only has a GSM receiver on it, it won't pick up a CDMA signal.

    It's not like you can use a Sprint phone on Cingular's network if they're both operating at 1900 mhz, right? Different technologies, different networks.

    I'm sure there are GSM/CDMA boosters out there, but if this is just GSM, it won't do anything for CDMA networks such as Sprint, Verizon, Alltel, etc.
  7.    #7  
    Letsgoflyer, now I know why there is a graduation cap on your head. Thanks for the info.
    Lance
    http://www.aslmentor.com
    (my avatar means "I love you" in sign language.
    --------------------------
    PalmIII->Sidekick I-->Sidekick II -->Sidekick III and now Treo 750 which blows them all away.
  8. #8  
    Haha, no problem. That's my puppy though.
  9. #9  
    it is a signal boster, not a GSM booser. What they're trying to say is that Sprint doesn't transmit 1900 in all areas, so essentially, ymmv. But if it does, it will boost that signal for you.
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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by g-funkster View Post
    it is a signal boster, not a GSM booser. What they're trying to say is that Sprint doesn't transmit 1900 in all areas, so essentially, ymmv. But if it does, it will boost that signal for you.
    I still don't see how it would work for CDMA. If it's going to boost a signal, it needs to be able to receive the signal, boost it, and retransmit it. It essentially consists of a GSM antenna, it sends the signal down coax, then comes out of the base station wirelessly still in a GSM signal, amplified. If the receiving antenna and transmitter are GSM, how is it going to receive a CDMA signal and transmit it? It doesn't matter if it's the same 1900 mhz bandwidth if it's a different form of network altogether. For the record, I'm almost positive Sprint's network is still 100% 1900 CDMA (not counting Nextel's iDEN). Dual band Sprint phones that work on 800 mhz roam on other carriers.
  11. ink883's Avatar
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    #11  
    aslmentor,

    I tried the signal booster you linked to, and it didn't help. Spent $300 dollars at Frys, and had to return it a couple of days later. It may have worked better if I would have been able to run the antenna to the roof, but I have in an aptartment, so the best I could do was stick it on my patio.

    I am on Sprint, and sprint uses 1900 (800 is for roaming on other carriers). A sprint tech told me the more expensive Wilson setups are the only ones that seemed to work. However, I can't afford them, and am still looking for a solution.

    Good Luck, let us know if you get your issue solved.
    Visor --> Visor Platinum --> Treo 300 --> Treo 600 --> Treo 650 --> Treo 700p --> Treo 755p --> Treo 800w --> Palm Pre
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by ink883 View Post
    aslmentor,

    I tried the signal booster you linked to, and it didn't help. Spent $300 dollars at Frys, and had to return it a couple of days later. It may have worked better if I would have been able to run the antenna to the roof, but I have in an aptartment, so the best I could do was stick it on my patio.

    I am on Sprint, and sprint uses 1900 (800 is for roaming on other carriers). A sprint tech told me the more expensive Wilson setups are the only ones that seemed to work. However, I can't afford them, and am still looking for a solution.

    Good Luck, let us know if you get your issue solved.
    what about the spotwave device?
    Does Fry carry those? If so, give it a shot?
    Lance
    http://www.aslmentor.com
    (my avatar means "I love you" in sign language.
    --------------------------
    PalmIII->Sidekick I-->Sidekick II -->Sidekick III and now Treo 750 which blows them all away.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by aslmentor View Post
    what about the spotwave device?
    Does Fry carry those? If so, give it a shot?
    CNET has a review

    http://reviews.cnet.com/Spotwave_Zen...-31645758.html
  14. Minsc's Avatar
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    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by letsgoflyers81 View Post
    I still don't see how it would work for CDMA. If it's going to boost a signal, it needs to be able to receive the signal, boost it, and retransmit it.
    Sure, but it doesn't need to decode the signal. 1900 mhZ is 1900 mhZ. Waves are waves. It doesn't matter what's traveling on those waves. Here's an admittedly lame analogy:

    Picture a megaphone. It amplifies sound waves. Whether I speak english, german, or french in to the megaphone - it amplifies all of them equally. It doesn't care what language I speak, it just deals with sound waves. Same thing with a signal booster.
  15. #15  
    There are two makers of affordable boosters that come in both "in-building" and "mobile" versions. As a techie living in a part of the country with some of the sparcest wireless coverage, I've become a specialist. Without my mobile booster, I'd have almost no cellular coverage. The best of the two is made by Wilson Electronics. My second choice, but still usable is made by Wi-Ex. I use a Wi-Ex in building booster with decent results in a small office. I've sold the Wi-Ex mobile device, but prefer the Wilson for mobile. In reality, the Wilson is still the best overall in both categories. Follow the info in their specs and skip debating whether one protocol will work on one model vs. the other. Compatibiltiy is a matter of frequency in all but the IDEN family. IDEN requires an IDEN compatible device.
    I'd be pleased to explain more about how to evaluate whether one is a good candidate for either device if there are still inquisitive minds following this thread.
    Mark
    Mark Bergman
  16. #16  
    I use the PowerMax for small buildings. It works for me... $399 from this source (retail ~$799).

    http://www.gpsandmarineworld.com/dig...da4000sbr.html

    It says "for small buildings/offices and large yachts". I told my wife, next, we're gonna need a yacht!

    -Frank
  17.    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bergman View Post
    I'd be pleased to explain more about how to evaluate whether one is a good candidate for either device if there are still inquisitive minds following this thread.
    Mark
    Please do!!
    As depth as you want to!
    Lance
    http://www.aslmentor.com
    (my avatar means "I love you" in sign language.
    --------------------------
    PalmIII->Sidekick I-->Sidekick II -->Sidekick III and now Treo 750 which blows them all away.
  18. #18  
    I live in a rural area with little (Sprint) coverage. Outside I may get a bar or two inside = No Service. I am also self employed and my cell phone is my livelihood. There are times when I would very much like my phone to work at home but it just doesn't. I've looked at boosters but I'd like to hear of real world accounts of how well they work. There are more products out there than testimonials.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    I live in a rural area with little (Sprint) coverage. Outside I may get a bar or two inside = No Service. I am also self employed and my cell phone is my livelihood. There are times when I would very much like my phone to work at home but it just doesn't. I've looked at boosters but I'd like to hear of real world accounts of how well they work. There are more products out there than testimonials.
    You have a tough case. Boosters are primarily designed to pipe a good signal from outside to inside, when otherwise you would lose signal inside. If you start with a bad signal outside, your results will not be as good.

    Having said that... a booster can definitely change a "no-signal" inside to one or two bars and enough to make/receive calls relatively reliably. That is my case. I have a lousy but usually usable signal if I stand on my roof (I don't do that very often!). But it deteriorates into 1 bar or no signal inside my garden level (half basement) steel siding (RF repellent!) house. Using the booster I can make receive calls about 80 percent of the time while inside. Better than almost never, without the booster.

    However, not all amplifiers/repeaters are created equal. You want to go for a unit that has more coverage than you really need. Because none of 'em will put out the "potential" coverage that they advertise. Those numbers are kinda theoretical. The unit I use (and gave a link to in an earlier message) is rated at 60dB amplification and "up to" 5000 sq. ft.

    You will find that the better the outside signal, the better your distance from the inside antenna will be. If you have a great outside signal, you'll be able to achieve close to the max rated distance from the inside antenna. If you have a very weak signal at your outside antenna, you'll have to be much closer to the inside antenna to use it effectively. This is where that "up to" 5000 sq. ft. comes in. It relates to the distance from the inside antenna where it works.

    Don't be fooled, if you have zilch signal outside, you will not be able to get a decent signal inside by amplifying it. These amplifiers require at least as good of a signal that a cell phone would normally require (on your roof, or wherever you mount your external antenna) in order to work. Assuming you have enough signal to make one work, then, the quality/strength of that original signal will determine the operating distance from the inside antenna.

    In many cases, if your outside signal is very weak to begin with, you're better off with a wired amplifier rather than a wireless amplifier (less loss).

    In any case, there is some risk it will not work for you. Check out return policies before purchase.

    Another thing to note: In the more powerful units (like the 60dB units), it is very important that the external antenna be far away from the internal antenna to avoid oscillations and feedback (IOW, not working). On the unit I bought (60dB gain), a minimum of 40 feet is required between the outside and inside antennas. Less powerful units do not require this amount of separation. A mobile unit, for example, is relatively low power and can operate with only minimal separation between outside and inside antennas. This will work because your distance from the inside antenna is very small (a foot or two?) so not very much power is needed.

    Just some thoughts.

    -Frank
    Last edited by Frankxs; 05/14/2007 at 11:34 PM.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    I live in a rural area with little (Sprint) coverage. Outside I may get a bar or two inside = No Service. I am also self employed and my cell phone is my livelihood. There are times when I would very much like my phone to work at home but it just doesn't. I've looked at boosters but I'd like to hear of real world accounts of how well they work. There are more products out there than testimonials.
    There is a surprisingly limited amount of customer testimonials out there for cellular amplifiers which is surprising as they are products which potential customers are pretty skeptical about. Perhaps due to those cheap antenna extensions on ebay, which are useless. I have experience with these types of amplifiers however and the majority of times the results are satisfactory. There is a collection of cell phone amplifier reviews here

    Also, In regards to the CDMA Vs GSM debate - Cellphone repeaters are not CDMA or GSM specific. That is to say, if a repeater claims to work on the 1900 MHz frequency band, then it will amplify all signals on that frequency, regardless of whether it utilizes GSM or CDMA technology.
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