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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post
    nobody is going to have to worry about alp in the US. It will never get here. All they care about is the far east market, and now they don't have to do an emulation layer for Garnet apps. Gassee and his crew have done it again. First there was BeOS, then cobalt, now alps.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Louis_Gass%C3%A9e
    Wow this guy (not counting Apple) has failed 4 projects in a row. Impressive.

    I do want to know whose ides it was to waste 11 millions to buy BeOS.
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    #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by whatever7 View Post
    Wow this guy (not counting Apple) has failed 4 projects in a row. Impressive.

    I do want to know whose ides it was to waste 11 millions to buy BeOS.
    Maybe he didnt sell much, but BEOS had some nice technical ideas, so i wont call it a technical failure.
  3. #23  
    "Colligan also revealed that this was a new platform that Palm has been working on, in house for a number of years."

    http://www.palminfocenter.com/news/9...bile-platform/

    Is there any reason to believe that this isn't true?

    EDIT: this was a response to Surur's and Perry's posts above. The wine had me confused as as to which page I was on
  4. ion++'s Avatar
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    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post
    nobody is going to have to worry about alp in the US. It will never get here. All they care about is the far east market, and now they don't have to do an emulation layer for Garnet apps. Gassee and his crew have done it again. First there was BeOS, then cobalt, now alps.
    I see some point in making ALP Palm OS compatible, that means people have more application choices and they can run their existing applications.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcol View Post
    "Colligan also revealed that this was a new platform that Palm has been working on, in house for a number of years."

    http://www.palminfocenter.com/news/9...bile-platform/

    Is there any reason to believe that this isn't true?

    EDIT: this was a response to Surur's and Perry's posts above. The wine had me confused as as to which page I was on
    The first Linux job postings were in August 2005. I would assume the work only began in earnest in 2006. Various job postings suggested they were working on their own browser and e-mail client, but we now know they decided to buy in both (smart move) This will add a lot of integration work. IN addition they have added designers to spruce up their UI, but this is also a very recent development. At most they have 18 months of work on PalmLinux, which we know from their own slides is how long it takes to take a current smartphone with a current OS to market. If they propose to bring a device to the market by the end of the year the OS should really be finished by now, which does not appear realistic.

    Surur
  6. #26  
    So Colligan is either mis-quoted or lying? Couldn't it be that earlier than that they recruited without job postings?
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcol View Post
    So Colligan is either mis-quoted or lying? Couldn't it be that earlier than that they recruited without job postings?
    'A number of years' equal more than one. 18 months is more than one. To do significant work they need a team, so even if they were in the idea stage for longer it does not tell us much about their ability to progress.

    Surur
  8. #28  
    Palm is located in the heart of Silicon Valley, where engineers change jobs will alarming frequency. Its not a stretch of the imagination at all to believe that there are more than a few Palm engineers who either acquired Linux experience at other jobs or took it upon themselves to learn Linux outside of their normal job. Palm could have had people working on this for quite some time before advertising for specific expertise to augment a team. Not saying that is what happened, as I don't live in the valley or have any connection with Palm, but I think it silly to assume that Palm had no engineers with Linux knowledge before they advertised for a new position.
  9. #29  
    ..or they could have just rung up people they know or used a recruitment agency. Job postings on a web site don't seem like a very reliable way of determining when a project started unless they explicitly state that the job involves starting the project!
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    'A number of years' equal more than one. 18 months is more than one.
    18 months is 'a number of years'? Not the way I use the language it isn't!
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcol View Post
    18 months is 'a number of years'? Not the way I use the language it isn't!
    Not much separate the use of language by politicians and CEO's. One has to remember that Palm at the same time was supposedly dealing with Access to purchase ALP, and look how that turned out.

    Quote Originally Posted by marcol View Post
    ..or they could have just rung up people they know or used a recruitment agency. Job postings on a web site don't seem like a very reliable way of determining when a project started unless they explicitly state that the job involves starting the project!
    True, and I guess that means we dont have much information either way.

    Surur
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    The first Linux job postings were in August 2005. I would assume the work only began in earnest in 2006. Various job postings suggested they were working on their own browser and e-mail client, but we now know they decided to buy in both (smart move) This will add a lot of integration work. IN addition they have added designers to spruce up their UI, but this is also a very recent development. At most they have 18 months of work on PalmLinux, which we know from their own slides is how long it takes to take a current smartphone with a current OS to market. If they propose to bring a device to the market by the end of the year the OS should really be finished by now, which does not appear realistic.

    Surur
    Sure they hired someone but that doesn't mean that they didn't already have some programmers that were more than proficient with linux before they hired someone new.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by Musicman247 View Post
    Actually, Access's OS built on the PalmOS 5 is called GarnetOS. Palm bought the rights back to the name PalmOS, so Access can't say that their OS is PalmOS. Thus, as was said before, it seems they will be in the 'me too' catagory at the end of this year.
    Thanks for that clarification. Can we understand from that that neither the names PalmOS or Palm can be used by Access from the time of that deal onward?
  14. #34  
    So, Access pays, what? $300 million for PalmSource then sells perpetual rights for Garnet to Palm for $44 million?

    Did they really need PalmSource in order to make a Linux-based OS?
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