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  1. #21  
    I don't know the Palm executives or their financial affairs. But in my career I have had many executives of publicly traded companies as clients and participated in the process of deciding if/when to exercise options, sell, etc. There is SO much information that is unknown to us. The wife might want to remodel the kitchen. Kids are in college. Options are about to expire. Etc. The controls placed by the securities lawyers on insider sales are profound. The execs are acutely aware that their actions will be examined and interpreted by stock market Nostradamuses. The SEC will whack them with a stick if they do something out of bounds. The bottom-dwelling parasites will file class action suits for no reason at all.
  2. #22  
    On the mobile site....

    Forgot to reach a conclusion.

    My point is to not read too much into insider transactions until you know that you know sufficient information to render a decent guess.

    My guess is that no one on TC knows enough. If they do, they ain't posting.
  3. #23  
    Jesus I hope Palm get it over with. I prefer Moto and Dell over Nokia. Both Moto and Dell should offer a nice upgrade path for me to get a Treo 750 style phone with higher rec one years down the road.

    With s60v3, I doubt Nokia will care enough to add touch screen to the new Palm phone. Plus they don't respcet the SD card format. Bad news to me
  4. #24  
    I don't really care about which company acquires Palm, I just want Palm to act more like a standalone company still that churns out Palm-esque products, just with someone telling them to get more innovative
  5. #25  
    Wouldn't mind a Nokia flip Treo.
  6. cgk
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    #26  
    Talking to people "in the know" - all of those rumours come indirectly from Palm.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickS View Post
    Wouldn't mind a Nokia flip Treo.
    You don't really think Nokia make flip phones do you?
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by whatever7 View Post
    You don't really think Nokia make flip phones do you?
    A Nokia flip phone is at least, if not bigger than, a treo...they cram everything except the kitchen sink and qwerty into those suckers. I know the big one now (N93) has some sort of giant mem capacity and a camcorder built in.
  9. dpc
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    #29  
    if they're coming indirectly from Palm is that an indication of stock inflation, or that they really are selling themselves off?
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    Talking to people "in the know" - all of those rumours come indirectly from Palm.
    Interesting. I still find it a bit hard to believe but supposing Nokia do acquire Palm, what do people think they'll do with it? What would people like to see them do with it?

    If the reason is for increased presence in the US market I guess it makes little sense to rebrand Treos as Nokia devices or rip out the Palm OS and simply replace with S60. So just management changes and addition of Nokia's fairly formidable design expertise? Acceleration of the Palm's Linux OS? Something more radical like a Palm UI on a Symbian core? The last option could give us something very sweet, IMHO.
  11.    #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcol View Post
    Interesting. I still find it a bit hard to believe but supposing Nokia do acquire Palm, what do people think they'll do with it? What would people like to see them do with it?.
    Seen at PalmInfoCenter

    http://www.cnn.com/TECH/computing/99...idg/index.html

    http://www.palm.com/us/company/pr/1999/nokia1.html


    Nokia and Palm Computing to Combine Expertise
    Palm Computing announced Wednesday, October 13, a broad licensing and joint development agreement with Nokia to create a new pen-based product category. Nokia, the world's leading mobile phone supplier, and Palm Computing, the world's leader in handheld computing, will join their respective expertise to expand the Palm OSŪ operating system as a platform for smart phones, combining wireless voice and data access with mobile information management and handheld organizer capabilities.

    Consumers will get all the benefits of a pen-based wireless device, integrating telephony with data applications, AND all the personal and professional information management capabilities they find today in the Palm™ devices. They'll also have access to the rich library of software applications developed for Palm organizers.
    The community of thousands of software developers will see a whole new range of application opportunities.
    The industry and third-parties will benefit from a powerful, extended Palm OS platform, enabling a new class of pen-based wireless products.
    "This is part of our strategy to make the Palm Computing platform the leading way for people to access and manage the information that is critical to their businesses and to their lives," said Palm Computing president Alan Kessler. "This is also an exciting new opportunity for the Palm Economy. It will provide an innovative, flexible foundation for our licensees and thousands of developers to expand the mobile information management market into new territories worldwide."
    And what came of it?
    Palm and Nokia actually do have some history.

    Surur
  12. #32  
    Here's an article from the WSJ regarding a possible Takover:

    Facing More Competition,
    Palm Explores Options
    By DENNIS K. BERMAN and PUI-WING TAM
    March 5, 2007

    Palm Inc., maker of the Treo smart phone, is working with investment bankers to explore its strategic options. The Sunnyvale, Calif., company is working with Morgan Stanley to evaluate options ranging from a sale, an investment by private equity or a purchase of its own, people familiar with the matter say.

    A Palm spokeswoman said the company doesn't comment "on rumor and speculation."

    Palm has been the subject of relentless rumors that it is a takeover target. (See related article.) The company, which has transitioned from hand-held computers to high-end cellphones in the past few years, faces intense competition in the cellphone industry. With a market capitalization of less than $2 billion, Palm is considered a tiny player compared with giants such as Motorola Inc. and Nokia Corp.

    What's more, Motorola and Nokia have introduced products similar to Palm's Treo, which combines a cellphone with a hand-held computer. Apple Inc. will introduce a cellphone this year that is expected to increase the competitive stakes.

    Palm also has had trouble selling its Treo to corporations, where Research In Motion Ltd.'s BlackBerry is entrenched.

    In February 2006, one of Palm's biggest individual shareholders, Mark Nelson, sent a letter to the board urging directors to explore a sale of the company. Mr. Nelson, who owned more than 6% of Palm's shares at the time, said the company was in a competitive market that faced "slowing innovation, commoditization and choked margins." In November 2005, another major shareholder, Swiss hedge fund Sagio Investments SA, wrote a letter to the board decrying the company's stock price at the time.

    A person familiar with Palm said a sale of the company wasn't on the table as of late last year because Ed Colligan, Palm's chief executive, wanted to keep the company independent. Since then, the competitive landscape has grown harsher with news of Apple's imminent entry into cellphones.

    Friday, Palm's stock soared $1.81, up nearly 11% in 4 p.m. Nasdaq composite trading to $18.30 on Wall Street talk and a report on Web site Unstrung that the company was near a deal with Nokia. A person close to the matter said a Nokia deal was far from certain but noted that Palm was trying to explore its options.

    For its second quarter ended in November, Palm reported a 95% drop in net income, largely due to a year-earlier tax gain and a 12% drop in revenue. It also lowered its outlook. The situation was compounded by the delay of a key product, the Treo 750, because of certification issues with carriers.

    The company also said it had more than $500 million in cash. Mr. Colligan has talked about using some of that cash for acquisitions.

    Write to Dennis K. Berman at dennis.berman@wsj.com and Pui-Wing Tam at pui-wing.tam@wsj.com
  13. #33  
    One potential buyer I haven't seen mentioned is Google. They purchased Android 2 years ago, and their mobile strategies appear to be aligning, with the exception of Google CEO Eric Schmidt's statement that handsets could be free to the end-user due to an ad-subsidized model.
  14. #34  
  15. cgk
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    #35  
    LONDON (Dow Jones) -- Some partnerships, like romances, just aren't meant to be.

    That was essentially the message several industry observers conveyed on Tuesday when asked whether it would make sense for Nokia, the world's largest mobile-phone maker, to acquire struggling smart-phone and handheld organizer pioneer Palm.

    "We do not believe that Palm holds any significant attraction for Nokia and see no reason why Nokia would want to acquire it," said Richard Windsor, a London-based analyst with Nomura International.

    Carolina Milanesi, a principal analyst in Gartner's mobile-devices team, was even blunter.

    "This doesn't make any sense," she said, stressing that buying Palm would be a huge strategic about-face for Nokia, which uses the Symbian operating system in its enterprise devices as opposed to the Palm and Windows Mobile platforms used by the U.S. company.
    http://www.cellular-news.com/story/22425.php
  16. #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by whatever7 View Post
    Jesus I hope Palm get it over with. I prefer Moto and Dell over Nokia. Both Moto and Dell should offer a nice upgrade path for me to get a Treo 750 style phone with higher rec one years down the road.

    With s60v3, I doubt Nokia will care enough to add touch screen to the new Palm phone. Plus they don't respcet the SD card format. Bad news to me
    I agree that i would rather motorola, hp, or dell buy palm. I never have liked nokia and they seem to be a little crazy with decideing to buy/merge (sanyo and others?) with people and then call it off only to have buy/merge rumors with other companies (palm). They don't seem to have a clue what they want to do in CDMA. Dell or HP on the other hand bring a new face to the game. Moto seems to do well with design and could bring a new form factor to the treo although they just released the q so i am not sure if they would be to interested.
    -Parrott84

    The Treo 700wx was a great device. Especially for one handed use, but it would be hard to give up my Mogul now.

    myChristianConnection.org
  17. #37  
    Palm takeover expected this week: report

    http://biz.yahoo.com/rb/070320/palm_takeover.html?.v=3

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Palm Inc. (NasdaqGS:PALM - News) could be sold for at least $20 per share this week, and private equity firm Texas Pacific Group and at least three other bidders are interested, according to unnamed sources cited by technology news Web site Unstrung.com.
  18. #38  
    I wonder how hard Motorola will push since they are positioning themselves to accommodate CDMA.

    "Motorola announced March 19 that its MC70 Enterprise Digital Assistants product line now supports CDMA-EVDO (Evolution-Data Optimized), which is a wireless broadband standard, networks, enabling users to expand their reach by eradicating network barriers and giving users a tool that supports applications for the on-the-go worker. Article"
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