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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    This is my first entry in the TreoCenteral forum. And since I have already benefited from it, I feel that I should do a little to help others.

    It took me quite a while to find the following entry:
    http://discussion.treocentral.com/sh...&postcount=222

    ... since it was buried in a very long thread filled with frustraited people like me who had the same problem.

    So I thought it might be nice if there were a thread all by itself that dealt with this problem and its fix.

    First off - this is for people searching for a solution to this problem:
    mysterious big small and mid-sized bright orange yellow spots dots fungus blobs clumps pixels appearing on display touch screen.

    Here is what appears to be the first solution to this problem, which appears to have been posted on a Weblog. http://blogs.osafoundation.org/mitch/000742.html

    And here is the pertinent information in that entry so that you don't even have to click around:

    Orange Treo flu?

    DO NOT return your Treo.
    DO NOT pay several hundred dollars.

    I have discovered the no-cost, low-tech, permanent cure for the common orange blob - so DO share this message with your fellow Treo-nauts.

    What causes orange Treo screen-flu? Simply this: water molecules under one layer of the screen (which can happen if you used your Treo outdoors in wet weather). When too much water gets into one part of the screen, that part of the screen turns orange and also starts "infecting" nearby pixels. So ...
    ... to cure the "flu," you need to spread the water molecules around enough so that no location has a "critical mass" sufficient to trigger the orange-osity.
    How do you do that? Simple - take your stylus (or a fingernail) and scrub from the center of the stain outward, up and down and beyond in all directions from the center of the stain to the center of the screen. (Don't damage the screen - use about the same pressure that you would use if scraping chewing-gum off that screen while trying to get it absolutely all off.)
    With this procedure, you'll probably find it takes only about 5 or 10 minutes (15 minutes in really tough cases/big stains) for the orange disfiguration to become smaller and smaller, paler and paler ... and eventually totally disappear. (NOTE: Even after the orange blob disappears, when turning on the device you may *momentarily* see - for just a split-second right before the back-light turns on - a faint constellation of teeny-tiny very-pale-orange specks. However: just as soon as the device finishes turning on the screen will look entirely normal and "factory-new," with nary an intrusive citrus-hued pixel in sight. So regard those temporary micro-blob-ettes as little "surgical scars" from your successful operation to cure the common orange-itis.)

    Posted by: KateGladstone at December 22, 2005 11:22 AM
    Thank you Kate Gladstone, where ever you may be.

    How did you figure this out? And why doesn't Palm know about this fix?!
    Last edited by marq5; 11/25/2006 at 11:59 AM.
  2.    #2  
    I also want to add that following this procedure did save my Treo 600 from ending in the trash.

    I had two rather large (raindrop sized) orange spots on my display, which made it very difficult to read / see important things.

    Using the KateGladstone method, I managed to join the two spots into a blob, and was able to move the blob to the right edge of the screen. It has not disappeared, but it is not blocking any important information anymore.

    However, I did cause some damage to my display by pressing it hard.

    My display has developed two areas of increased luminance. That means there are two areas which are brighter on my display than they were before I began pushing my orange blob across the screen.

    These areas of brightness were preceded by what appeared to be a colorless spot in the area where I had just applied significant pressure with the pad of my thumb to the display. This colorless spot went away after more gentile massaging of the touch-screen in that area. (I am developing a rather disturbing relationship to my Treo after this experience)

    None the less the brighter region is persisting. I do have the feeling that that this may be getting better over time - but I expect that this condition maybe permanent (I don't feel like being optimistic). So be warned.

    So I think that this procedure is for people who either no longer have a guarantee on their Treo, are sick of sending it in to Palm, have bought it cheap on Ebay (like me), or feel like having a unique experience with their hand held. By the way having the screen fixed by Palm, would have cost around 180 EUR here in Germany.

    Also a last note: I noticed that with a little practice, one could probably shape the blob - Maybe this could turn into a kind of Treo tuning, like wallpaper, only more brutal - like Treo scaring or something like that.
    If anyone manages to turn their Treo screen blob into anything interesting maybe it would be worth posting.

    Cheers,

    DK
  3. #3  
    My dead / dying pixels were bright yellow gold - kind of pretty really. But, they were migrating or infecting those around them and creating a longer and longer bright yellow irregular line down the middle of my screen.

    I didn't want to damage my screen like the previous reply's author, so I used the flat end of my stilus -- the end that looks like a little golf club. It didn't work for me to rub anything back and forth with it. I just applied pressure on top of the yelow line with the flat end of the stilus, then lifted, then pressed, then lifted, etc. The whole thing is almost gone!! Yippeee!!!

    Thanks to all who posted on this!!!! I honestly thought it was another $400 down the drain afteronly a year...
  4.    #4  
    I just wanted to update what is going on with my display:

    I have managed to spread the orange plague to the edges of my Treo display.

    The Display has suffered from my periodic messages - it has lost a lot of its contrast. This is probably due to the fact that the now many small orange blobs and specks create a gray (negative) halo around them.

    I'm happy because I can see everything I need to on the display - but compared to a "healthy" Treo 600 display, mine now looks like trash.

    The method described by the previous entry:

    I just applied pressure on top of the yelow line with the flat end of the stilus, then lifted, then pressed, then lifted, etc. The whole thing is almost gone!! Yippeee!!!
    doesn't seem to work for me.
  5. #5  
    Once that blob has moved to the edge, try packing your Treo in silica packets to dry it out.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...arch&Q=&ci=204
  6. #6  
    Wow I did not make any research in the last years but back in the "old" times when the problem did start on me 600 I could not find anything about it. It was replaced once and they had no idea what caused it. Now I am using my old 600 again and want to switch to a 680. Do you think it will have the same Problem or is that solved in new Display generations? Cause I am not gonna carry it in a waterproof case just bc it sometimes rains in Austria

    Cheers

    Robert
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    #7  
    As I realised on a recent multi-stop holiday, this "issue" doesnt need to be seen as a problem. In fact it adds an extra feature to your Treo, which in the right hands could perhaps even be marketed:

    Atmospheric Humidity Indicator!

    I found that as we moved from place to place, the size of the blobs would shrink or swell, depending on local air moisture levels. One poorly ventilated, north-facing and rather dank room really made the blobs go crazy.

    On a more practical level, I found the recommended stylus-nudging very effective in breaking up and moving around the blobs, and was amazed at how much pressure the screen could take. I do have a rather rigid screen-protector though, so that obviously affects the equation. I wonder actually if the screen protector played any part in the initial trapping of the moisture, and would like to remove it, but it seems really stuck on now.

    I will try one of the suggestions above, ie silica gel, to help the drying process.
  8.    #8  
    My blobs have appeared without the use of a screen protector. So that would indicate that that is not a major factor.

    I wonder why some people's blobs seem to go away with display massaging, and others do not (like mine).

    Could that have to do with the PH of the moisture?

    I Like the silica gel idea. Leaving the Treo on a low heat source (radiator) for several days has not seemed to have any effect.

    I did notice that an old Treo 270 I had on the shelf for about 6 months no longer has the yellow spot on the display which moved me to upgrade to the treo 600. So maybe letting the device run out of power and not touching them for a long time will heal them.

    I'm also wondering what the difference between the colors of the spots might indicate. My indestructible blobs are bright orange. The spot that has vanished from my Treo 270 was clearly more yellow in color...
  9. #9  
    I figured out the cause of "orange fungus" by recalling that my first Treo's "fungus" appeared after I got caught in a rainstorm, and my second Treo's "fungus" appeared after I'd left it in the bathroom during a hot shower.

    Kate Gladstone — http://learn.to/handwrite
  10. #10  
    Why Palm doesn't know about the "orange fungus" fix — I suspect that Palm *does* know, but that Palm prefers you buy a new Treo ... or at least send in your old Treo so that THEIR guys can do the "stylus massage" and charge you for it ...
    By the way, I LOVE the silica-packets idea, and hope that some enterprising Treo-accessories maker will make a case with silica embedded between the outer and inner walls ... if you do, please contact me (and "Johnacraft" who first thought of using silica) to let us get some teensy share of the profits. (I don't know how to find "Johnacraft," but you can reach me via http://learn.to/handwrite or handwritingrepair@gmail.com )
    Possible names for an anti-orange-fungus Palm-case —
    "Silicure" ...
    or ... "Johnacraft/Gladstone Preserv-A-Palm" ...
    or ... "Egnaro" ["orange" spelled backwards] ...
    or ... "Hector, the Fungus Deflector."
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    #11  
    Am I right in thinking that this problem only affects the 600? I cant recall any posts for others, or at least for later models anyway.

    And I think i can also trace back my probs with my 600 to a shower episode.
  12.    #12  
    I have had my fungusized Treo packed in silica for the past three weeks and have noticed no decrease in the size of the spots unfortunately. Either the silica I am using is no longer active enough, or the membrane that let the moisture into the display works only one way.

    Anyway the silica idea was definitely good - but I don't think that is going to work.

    And I seem to remember some people with Treo 650s having spots - but maybe I am wrong.
  13.    #13  
    Just a small update:

    Exposing the infected LCD to constant dry heat will not get rid of the orange spots.

    I dismantled my Treo 600 and disconnected the LCD. This operation is not very difficult. I placed the display wrapped in a paper towel in my electric oven set to around 110 degrees Celsius (230 F). I baked the display for about a half an hour.

    This process did seem to reduce some of the spots that I had splintered off from the main big spot (with gray negative halo). But the main gray haloed spot seemed to be unaffected.

    The heat seemed to have a bad effect on the touch-screen however - it developed a very short hairline crack which doesn't seem to have effected its function.

    Even though the baking of the LCD did not effectively get rid of the orange plague, it did not damage it. I reassembled everything and the Treo works as it did before.
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    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by marq5 View Post
    Just a small update:

    Exposing the infected LCD to constant dry heat will not get rid of the orange spots.

    I dismantled my Treo 600 and disconnected the LCD. This operation is not very difficult. I placed the display wrapped in a paper towel in my electric oven set to around 110 degrees Celsius (230 F). I baked the display for about a half an hour.
    I admire your determined and methodical approach! I have a new 650, so Im not as motivated but I have been monitoring how my 600 reacts to what's now a very dry time of year where I am. The spots (very bright orange) have neither increased nor decreased in size. I can still break them up and move them around with the stylus (very vigorous rubbing but I do have a thick screen protector)--I have never been able to remove them. I dont have an oven -- do they sell them as treo accessories yet?
    geoff

    Treo 650 1.20 LAP.

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