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  1. #21  
    It seems like is in pretty good shape. Time to market is key here. If I were Palm I'd get a bare bones kernel functioning and a way to run OS5 apps.

    If they just came out with that it would spur development on the Linux platform and provide confidence to the market. With the above you'd essentially have an OS5 device but the statement it would make would be huge. They could release updates as they got more stuff working and tested.

    I'm not sure why they wouldn't use ALP or any other version of Linux already pretty far along. It isn't like they control Win Mobile so OS control isn't a show stopper.

    This can't be all that hard. What am I missing?
  2. #22  
    Hi gkaatz!

    IMHO:

    The success of the Treo is based on ease of use. Ease of use comes from two things: form factor and from the OS/Software combination.

    Win Mobile is here to stay, but the Palm OS has a 10 year legacy of use, users and software.

    I believe Palm wants to take back control of both factors (form and OS) in at least one of it's offerings. Whether they achieve this goal, I do not know. But as I believed that there would be a 700P -- I believe that there will be -- a next generation Treo (900P, if you will) that will have an OS that carries the ease of use philosophy into the future and is a PalmOS or (at the very least) has backwards compatiblity for the Palm community of users and software providers.

    We shall not be abandonded.

    Cheers, Perry.
  3. #23  
    Why do you think it's in good shape? Because Access says so? Gee, I remember the same thing said about Cobalt and nobody ever used that. I have seen very little out of ALP except for a few screenshots of some basic apps and press releases from ALP. Palm has been noticably absent from any Access quote which is the first hint they aren't happy with it. All along they have been saying end of 2006. Last press release I say said a "developer release" at the end of 2006, with "final" in mid 2007. Realistically that means a working version to hardware manufacters at end of 2007 with the first possible devices in mid 2008. Doesn't sound like it's in good shape to me at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by gkaatz View Post
    It seems like is in pretty good shape. Time to market is key here. If I were Palm I'd get a bare bones kernel functioning and a way to run OS5 apps.

    If they just came out with that it would spur development on the Linux platform and provide confidence to the market. With the above you'd essentially have an OS5 device but the statement it would make would be huge. They could release updates as they got more stuff working and tested.

    I'm not sure why they wouldn't use ALP or any other version of Linux already pretty far along. It isn't like they control Win Mobile so OS control isn't a show stopper.

    This can't be all that hard. What am I missing?
    Main Phone: Treo 270/600/650/700w/700p/750v/Motorola Q/iPhone
    Tried but sold: Motorola Q/Nokia E61/700wx/HTC TyTN/Treo 680
  4. #24  
    I was mixing up ALP in general with the OS5 emulator for ALP.

    There are already versions of mobile linux running on phones. Cobalt never ran on anything in production so that's the big difference in my mind. I don't care which Linux Palm goes with ALP, ChinaMobileSoft, vendor X, etc. The key is to get *something* running with the OS5 emulator.

    Once they have that it buys them some time. Developers can develop to OS5 knowing they have a huge install base or write to a Linux environment knowing there is a future path. If Palm picked one (and told us) the vendor could provide development tools, etc. I believe the market would take off.

    We all know OS5 is legacy. We just don't know if WinMob is the only future. In my mind only 1 vendor (Palm) has enough market clout the create a big enough demand for an alternative. I don't think Moto or Sharp can do it. Maybe Nokia can but they have so little penetration in the USA. If Palm committed to Linux publicly they would save everyone a lot of grief including themselves.
  5. #25  
    The problem here is that Access bought the rights to Palm OS and any backward compatability. I doubt they have any desire to support compatability on any Linux OS but their own. That puts the whole thing in a very iffy state. It would be great if they would sell the necessary pieces to Palm and Palm could put the whole thing together. I'm sure they want to, but it's unclear if this is ever doing to happen.
    Main Phone: Treo 270/600/650/700w/700p/750v/Motorola Q/iPhone
    Tried but sold: Motorola Q/Nokia E61/700wx/HTC TyTN/Treo 680
  6. #26  
    The problem here is that Access bought the rights to Palm OS and any backward compatability. I doubt they have any desire to support compatability on any Linux OS but their own. That puts the whole thing in a very iffy state. It would be great if they would sell the necessary pieces to Palm and Palm could put the whole thing together. I'm sure they want to, but it's unclear if this is ever doing to happen.
    OS 5 runs the palmOS in emulation. What Access is doing with ALP is making a newer OS and adding the emulator. Therefore backwards compatability will be enough to make us all upgrade and them have a nice sized user base (and loudly speaking one).

    If Palm could negociate for Garnet, they would actually be able to do more than just run things with PACE, but they could make more ARM native apps (see folks like Dimtry G who make ARM apps all the time I've been told) that would not only make Garnet more than sufficient, but also give them a slight leg up on Access in terms of user base and developer fun.

    Palm is most likely working with Access on one hand, working with MS on another, and then with their own OS in yet another. For them, their usability is their brand, and if they can spread that to Linux and WM, that works for them. If they can make their own OS that has that in spades, then its even better for them if the OS works.
    MMM | AntoineRJWright.com | BH | Jaiku

    Moved on to Symbian, but still will visit from time to time.
  7. #27  
    As much as I dislike to think it, I think MS will buy Palm (and effectively the Treo) sometime around the next version of WM.

    ALP will never see the light of day on a Treo (I hate to say it, but two years is just too long).

    A little part of me hopes that the 1997 OS that we are running on the 700p will somehow transform into a beautiful Linux butterfly, but I think it's all for naught.

    Cobalt was the future, and it went nowhere.
  8. #28  
    Folks, Palm is NOT making their own OS. Look at the software in 650->700p->680. There are more and more core components that are licensed from third parties. I wouldn't be surprised if Palm license TCMPM and rename it next.

    As for MS buying Palm, that's just silly.
  9. #29  
    Let me start by saying that I have moved on to WM. My Treo 600 served me well, but the 650 and 700 to me were just incremental upgrades. It will be difficult to persuade developers to develop new advanced apps for POS because the future is so murky. Developers know that WM will be around for a long time and MS will spare no resources to dominate the market.

    In the corporate side (in which I am a member) I just got a demo of MS' WM management system. Its a SMS plugin which allows IT to fully take over a handheld, including remote control. It was an amazing demo and we will be eveluating it shortly.

    MS means to dominate the corporate market and once they have that, personal device will follow. Its the same ploy they used for the desktop.
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