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  1.    #1  
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  2. cgk
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    #2  
    In what sense?
  3. #3  
    There is a number of provisos with those numbers.

    1) WM Smartphone actually excludes PDA phones, which then was the majority of the market. Of course with the Moto Q, T-Mobile Dash and Samsung i320 this may change rapidly.
    2) It seems any phone running Linux may be called a smartphone, but often these are closed devices without any third party software.
    3) Those are old number.

    Surur
  4.    #4  
    I couldn't find a more recent set of numbers. These just came to me today in some marketing info. I'll see if I can find something more recent, but I'm wondering if something changed. Why do you say that PDA phones are not included in the Microsoft numbers? (I missed this)
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    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
    Also: Treo 750 (Test phone) / Sony Ericcson w900 (unlocked for international travel)
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    In what sense?
    Mostly the large market share of Symbian and Linux and the smallish marketshare of Microsoft and RIM.
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    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
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  6. #6  
    I hardly consider most of these Linux and Symbian phones smart phones. If it doesn't have a touch screen, it's not a PDA phone; if it doesn't have at least a memory slot and a browser, it's not a smartphone.
  7. #7  
    Gartner's definition of smartphone is well known and controversial. The most accurate numbers of the state of the smartphone union tends to be Canalys numbers.

    Surur
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by whatever7 View Post
    I hardly consider most of these Linux and Symbian phones smart phones. If it doesn't have a touch screen, it's not a PDA phone; if it doesn't have at least a memory slot and a browser, it's not a smartphone.
    Symbian suppots both memory slots and browsers. The programming API is fairly rich as well. (I know that my companies mobility apps run on Symbian just fine.)

    Linux ... I have yet to knowingly use a phone that ran Linux.
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    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
    Also: Treo 750 (Test phone) / Sony Ericcson w900 (unlocked for international travel)
  9. #9  
    Some symbian phones may qualify as SmartPhones, but the majority of them don't take advantage of the features the OS offers. They're pretty much just fancy phones, is all.

    Having read a great many Gartner reports in my field of expertise, I'd say guess that a lot of their "experts" are kids fresh out of college who get most of their info from reading trade magazines and making guesses. In some cases, their lack of knowledge and understanding leaves me dumbstruck.

    Going back a couple of years and reviewing their predictions is an interesting exercise, too. I suspect they're about as accurate as Jean Dixon was before she died. Come to think of it, she's more accurate now than she was alive.
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.
  10.    #10  
    I didn't know she died.
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    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
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  11. #11  
    Motorola sells large number of Linux smartphones in China/APAC. The Motorola Ming is a great example of that. It is a smartphone by all definitions - and yes it does have a touchscreen - that's the only way to input the chinese characters.
  12. #12  
    Jean Dixon, 1918-1997

    http://skepdic.com/dixon.html
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.

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