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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer Lucas View Post
    Blazer. Over WiFi. For two hours. That's just silly.
    keefer, wifi might not be fore you but it certainly is for many users and THAT is what counts.

    Fact is there are a lot of phones that come with wifi now and no one is regrettng that it has wifi, the only regrets are when it doesn't. The Unwired even said so much about the 750v: "no wifi, no sale".

    And battery life is a poor argument. If a device is designed properly (Palm comes close, but hardly perfect) you can get very good battery life. Read the reviews for the HTC Dash: it's rated at 5 hours talk time but actually gets 11.

    When it comes to wifi:

    "During my 7 weeks of use I have to say the battery life is by far the "BEST" I have ever used. You probably are asking "Well how can that be with a device that has 802.11?" Very easily.. HTC has done a fantastic job with the power management console on the Dash. HTC has finally found the "secret sauce" when it deals with the wireless card in the Dash. What they have done is created a control panel that will auto-power down the WiFi if it is not used for a set amount of time (user defined anywhere from 10 seconds all the way up to 20 minutes).. My personal power tests have been extremely positive in which I was able to run for a full day and a half. Yes.. a day and a half"
    (source)

    Your argument is wrong every which way. People like choice and just b/c it has wifi doesn't mean you are required to use it.

    And back on topic, yet Palm is out to pasture. Only it's dedicated (yet waning) fan base keeps it "alive".

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  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer Lucas View Post
    Blazer. Over WiFi. For two hours. That's just silly.
    I've done it on multiple pdas/pdaphones. You've probably never done it.
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by gadgetluva View Post
    I've done it on multiple pdas/pdaphones. You've probably never done it.
    Name them.

    Nothing says 2002 like WiFi on a handheld device. Other handheld manufacturers like Motorola are ABANDONING WiFi, not integrating it...
    Last edited by Keefer Lucas; 10/23/2006 at 07:58 PM.
  4. #44  
    Wifi is so old and the general consumers don't hear much of wifi hotspots now a days. Used to be but now on tv commericals you hear all about some phone network wireless broadband. The power users usually get screwed with features because we know what was offered and what the devices are capable of while the general market usually don't know what features is missing.
  5. #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer Lucas View Post
    Name them.

    Nothing says 2002 like WiFi on a handheld device. Other handheld manufacturers like Motorola are ABANDONING WiFi, not integrating it...
    Cingular 8125
    iPaq 4355
    Treo 700w
    iPaq 2215


    Saying wifi kills a full battery in minutes? That's just asinine. Devices like the 6700 can go close to 2 hours on a full charge on wifi. Maybe an hour and a half of continuous useage. That's not minutes to me.
  6. #46  
    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer Lucas View Post
    Nothing says 2002 like WiFi on a handheld device. Other handheld manufacturers like Motorola are ABANDONING WiFi, not integrating it...
    And partly why the Q's sales are "lackluster"

    "Sales of the manufacturer’s Q, which combines a traditional mobile phone with Microsoft Windows-based programs, have been lackluster in the United States..."
    (source)

    Hardly a trendsetter in the biz.

    And it's why the HTC Dash when directly compared to the Q (it's obvious competitor) beats it: it has better battery life AND Wifi.

    Notice how most professional reviews consider lack a wifi a con not a pro for mobile devices? Why is that?

    Look, I know being on PalmOS/Treo you have zero choice when it comes to wifi, so I think you're spending a lot of time here trying convince yourself somehow that's a good thing.

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    #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer Lucas View Post
    Name them.

    Nothing says 2002 like WiFi on a handheld device. Other handheld manufacturers like Motorola are ABANDONING WiFi, not integrating it...

    Abandoning? That's why the upcoming e9 has wifi because they abandoning wifi ?
  8. cgk
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    #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by LupeValenz View Post
    Wifi is so old and the general consumers don't hear much of wifi hotspots now a days.
    Speak for yourself - wifi networks are expanding at a clip across the world - the uk has many cities becoming wireless cities where citizens can access services and the internet from whereever they are.
  9. #49  
    WiFi is a technology without an infrastructure.....today the geographical coverage is a fraction of a single percentage point. On a college campus, great. In business, when it is available, rarely can one say it's the best alternative.

    Again, HSDPA is a technology without an infrastructure. Cingular just finished upgrading parts of Manhattan and "da Hamptons", its first NYC foray. Geographical coverage is < 5 at best < 10%. They were suppossed to be almost finished by the end of 2006 but they put all tower upogrades on hold in March and just resumed building them out again. Based upon the original schedule, we aren't looking at substantial coverage until teh 2nd half of 2007. Europe is not expected to reach 50% coverage mark till late 2007 or 08.

    Perhaps it makes the owner get a nice warm feeling knowing he has the latest and greatest but, if I am the boss, I am not going to be enthused about employees trying to justify how more efficient they will be after I invest the company's money until there is a more extensive infrastructure in place.

    I think in one sense it's a misnomer to call anything the "Palm OS" as Palm no longer has an OS. PalmSource now owns the OS and Access owns them so if ya wanna talk literally and use the term for the current [what we still refer to as the Palm OS], you'd have to say "AccessPowered", "PalmSource" or Just "Access" cause that's who owns the OS on Treos today.

    Now in this, the correct context, the PlamSource OS is no more dead than WM5 is. MS is working on WM6 or whatever monicker they are gonna lay on it and PalmSource is working on ALP. Neither is dead just as Win2k was dead.....Win2k was so "not dead" that MS, in order to wipe the frowns off stockholders faces, had to record every Win2k sale as a WinXP sale with a "downgrade" to Win2k.

    Windows went from 16 bit to 32 bit to 64 bit code bases and still calls it Windows. I didn't hear anyone clamoring that Windows was dead during any of those evolutions. All Access is doing is replacing the proprietary kernel on Cobalt with a Linux code base. Orage has already adopted ALP.

    But Orange has leapfrogged those giants, becoming the first tier one mobile carrier to launch a Linux initiative, as opposed to supporting some isolated handsets.

    It is focusing its efforts not on the existing major mobile variants - notably MontaVista - but on the emerging Access Linux Platform, which incorporates the former Palm user interface.

    Orange has approved the Access Linux Platform (ALP) and will use the Japanese firm's product in conjunction with its own Orange Application Package to offer device manufacturers a turnkey mobile Linux platform. Like the Vodafone-DoCoMo initiative, this shows the carriers taking the initiative in driving new handset functionality, and working to reduce their costs and time to market by encouraging their suppliers to use standardized building blocks.

    Yves Maitre, vice president of devices at Orange, said: "This is part of our wider Signature Devices strategy, which delivers a consistent customer experience across a variety of devices and applications and.will enable us to foster the growth of the mobile Linux market."

    This is a major coup for Access, which acquired the former software arm of Palm, Palmsource, in order to combine the benefits of an open source OS and a user interface that has been well liked by operators and high end users.

    In doing so, it preserved many of the key Palm software technologies - even as the outlook for the PalmOS itself looked increasingly bleak, with Palm itself now supporting Windows Mobile too - and gave mobile Linux what it most badly needed, an acceptable interface.

    PalmSource will, over time, entirely replace the proprietary kernel in its Cobalt 6.1 PalmOS handset operating system with Linux. It will provide a future for the Palm community, even if Palm itself, the device making element of the company, which remains independent, shifts entirely to Windows.

    "As the stewards of PalmOS, we have included in ALP a compatibility engine (GHost) that provides forward compatibility for the 25,000 strong PalmOS application titles base - one of the largest in the mobile content and services market," said the Japanese company.

    This is the first mainstream deployment of the combined Access/Palmsource technology and so will be an interesting proving ground for other operators as well as for developers.

    Orange has built something of a reputation for gaining differentiation by supporting new operating systems at an early stage - it gave Windows Mobile its first major dose of credibility a few years ago when it supported it ahead of other tier one carriers.
    Ed Colligan states that selling off the OS division was a blunder he wished he could undo...he even tried to buy PalmSource back but Access had more money. We do know that Access is readying ALP and it appears that Palm has something in development should PalmSource misstep.

    Colligan is too smart a man to put all his eggs in one basket. He's not goin to let his company be pidgeonholed by MS and will keep his company's options open. Users don't care about code bases, they care about interfaces. If a move from Garnet to Cobalt would have been considered an evolution rather than a death, I am having trouble understanding from a users perspective how a move to Cobalt with a different kernel is soemthing different....that is any more different than a move from DOS / Windows 16 bit to Windows 95 32 bit and todays 64 bit Windows.
    Last edited by JackNaylorPE; 10/24/2006 at 10:48 AM.
  10. #50  
    Well said Jack.

    And people keep pointing to the wifi/battery life argument here. But wouldn't wifi also affect form factor? With something like the 680, which is going for a more comfortable smaller and lighter feel, adding features many users won't (or can't) use adds to size as well as price. And as it is, they are already using a smaller battery.
    Treo 180 > Treo 600 > ?? Treo 680 ??

  11. #51  
    Quote Originally Posted by jennyfur View Post
    Well said Jack.
    (1) I actually don't think it was well said. It was a lot of justifications and hope.

    Fact is there is no deal in place for Palm to use ALP. There is no evidence to suggest that any U.S. cell company is interested in ALP. ALP looks like a linux Symbian sytem (that is, sub-pda) not a WMx competitor.

    What does the former Chief Competitive Officer and VP of Product Planning at Palm, VP of Strategic Marketing at PalmSource, Michael Mace think?:

    But my main takeaway is that we should probably stop thinking of this thing as the successor to Palm OS, and instead judge it as a new mobile OS based on Linux.
    Even more surprising was the absence of any US operators. T-Mobile hasn't ever been warm to Palm OS, and Verizon is very conservative, so I wasn't alarmed that they weren't quoted. But where the heck is Sprint, the original champion of the Treo? And where's Cingular, which has lately been one of the biggest Treo endorsers? I think their absence is not a good sign.
    But my biggest question was, where are the licensees? Where are Samsung, LG, GSPDA, Garmin, Symbol? Where's Palm?
    (source)

    At this point ALP looks like it will be adopted/rolled out only in Asian markets (think China and Japan here and I guess Orange, which means nothing for the US) and there is zero evidence it will be adopted here in the U.S. at all. Everyone acts like this is the Nexgen Palm OS when in fact I doubt we'll ever see it here in the States.

    Palm as a company and OS has it's roots here in the US and that's it. Barely a dent in Europe and no one cares in Asia. And looking at Palm's numbers, I'm not even sure they can survive without being bought out sometime soon. They're getting crushed, pure and simple.

    This is NOTHING like Microsoft, who all but dominates the desktop OS market. People could hold on to that and wait till the nex-gen OS comes out because there's little choice: You do Mac or Windows (and the geeks to Linux). Palm is a blip on the radar as far as company and market size. They could disappear today and the market will be no different. By the time ALP comes out they will have lost a lot of market share. If it never comes out, no one will care as we'll all be using Symbian or WM.

    If all of this ALP/Palm stuff was happening 2 years ago, then it would be a big deal. PalmOS has been out to pasture for the last 16 months already. ALP wont' be out till late 2007. Too little, too late.

    (2) WiFi is a technology without an infrastructure: which is why people like it.

    I can use my Wifi at home, school, work and any hotel where I'm staying at where 3g is not available.

    You folks can argue every which way about why Wifi is good or bad, etc. but what you can't argue against is the free market:

    There is a demand for devices with Wifi. Pure and simple. Your comments mean nothing to actual numbers and what people look for in a device. If Wifi was so bad, so antiquated, so inefficient, so useless...no one would want it, no one would buy it and it would fade from the market like DivX DVDs.

    (3)
    But wouldn't wifi also affect form factor?

    Look at the HTC Dash: it's thinner and lighter than the whole Treo line. It has Wifi and a better battery life than the Treos.

    All of that with a 960 mAh battery! (Treo is 1800mah)

    This argument meant something 2 years ago, now it doesn't. Good gawd, they have MiniSD Wifi SDIO cards now...this is somewhat obvious how small it has gotten.
    Last edited by Malatesta; 10/24/2006 at 02:16 PM.

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  12. #52  
    Now THAT is well said!

    Surur
  13. #53  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    Fact is there is no deal in place for Palm to use ALP. There is no evidence to suggest that any U.S. cell company is interested in ALP. ALP looks like a linux Symbian sytem (that is, sub-pda) not a WMx competitor.
    There's lots of stuff that hasn't been made public but there's been many, many posts regarding Palm's hiring of dozens of Linux programmers. Another significant fact is that Palm was able to renegotiate its deal with PalmSource as a result of PalmSource's failure to meet OS development deadlines. Whether the OS Palm actually uses ALP or a linux developed "in house" is immaterial. An OS can't be considered dead when BOTH PalmSource and Palm are in active development. And how dead can it be when the "what do you want on your next Treo" polls here hows more than 10:1 Palm choice.

    I can use my Wifi at home, school, work and any hotel where I'm staying at where 3g is not available.
    Bingo. You "can" us it, it's poor choice that provides little or detrimental advantage but you "can" use it.

    At home......Gee what will make me more efficient ?....Grabbing my laptop and surfing at 29 Mbps or at typical WiFi speeds of 2 Mbps....I think I'll take the one that is 15 times faster....and while I am at it, I can type with all my fingers instead of just my thumbs and multitask on a 1920 x 1200 screen instead of a 240 x 240. It's a PDA, not a computer. Doing work on a PDA when you have a full size desktop / laptop available is all about "cause its cool", not because it's the best way to do something.

    http://compnetworking.about.com/od/w...peed80211b.htm

    While peak data rates may be acheivable at times, many 802.11b home network links typically run at 2-3 Mbps. This is still faster than broadband Internet connections, that normally operate at 0.5-2 Mbps peak for downloads.
    My 10 year old son can surf the internet on his PSP. He bugged me for a few months to turn on the wireless feature of our router so he could use it. So I did.....I was sitting down watching TV one night and he was on the PSP and he asked me if the router wireless feature was still tunred on, to whih I repsonsed "Haven't you been using it all this time" and his answer was "Nah, screen is too small, I go up to my computer for that."

    At school .... the one existing bastion of WiFi usability, but again for anything serious, why woulkdn't you want the readilly available PC's in ya dorm room, in the library and all over the place ?

    At work.... first person Joe Boss sees doing work on a PDA when he bought and paid for a desktop / laptop will wind up calling his wife / GF from the unemployment office within the hour.

    At hotel where 3G is not available .... I don't use 3G to answer e-mail on my Treo. If it's a trip of any length, I brought my laptop and that's a much better option. If it's a short trip, dude, walk into the hotel's business center and sit down at one of the free desktops sitting there for exactly that purpose.

    It's free ..... well two comments about that:

    1. It's not always free and it's often not free when advertised as such as evidenced by PC Mag's story this month on that very subject.

    2. If there was 100 times more coverage than there is now, it still wouldn't equal 1% geographical coverage. How do you measure the value of a feature that is not available in excess of 99.99 % of ya phone's 3G coverage area. So I guess "free" must also mean that in most places it's "not available at any price".

    (2) WiFi is a technology without an infrastructure: which is why people like it.
    That's a gem. How can people "like" the fact that it has no infrastructure when having no infrastructure means you can't use it. It's like having a cell phone and more than 99.99% of the places you can travel have no towers within signal range.

    There is a demand for devices with Wifi. Pure and simple. Your comments mean nothing to actual numbers and what people look for in a device.
    There's a demand for silly ringtones too. That doesn't give them a productive usage.

    "Hello Boss....I'd like to put in a request fo a new WM Treo with Wifi"

    "How will that help the company ?"

    "Well I will be able to access my corporate e-mail when a cellular signal is not available"

    "What is the cellular coverage rate right now ?"

    "Our carrier provides coverage in about 85% of the geographical US, reaching about 98% of the US population"

    "And WiFi ?"

    "geographical coverage is less the 1/100th of 1 % but I could also use it at home, at hotels and at client's offcies "

    "Didn't we buy you a laptop to do work from home ?

    "yes"

    "And don't all of our clients have PC's in their offices, and don't all the hotels have business centers with PC's available ?"

    "Er....yes"

    "Then what will WiFi capability give us that we don't have now"

    "Er.....well what about ringtones....can I get ringtones ?"

    If Wifi was so bad, so antiquated, so inefficient, so useless...no one would want it, no one would buy it and it would fade from the market like DivX DVDs.
    Who said it was antiquated, I said just the opposite. WiFi's infrastructure has not been built yet. It's a technology which will gain usefullness in the future when metropolitan areas finish building the infrastructure. Many cities are promising substantial (>80%) coverage in from 2-5 years. At that time WiFi will have the infrastructure that is necessary to make WiFi usage pervasive. For the Treo one buys today the question has to be asked "how much do I wanna pay for technology that I can't use 99% of the places I go ?". Assuming a 24 month purchase cycle, my next Treo purchase will be entirely different question.

    I notice you didn't address the absence of HSDPA coverage at all. The fact remains that HSDPA coverage is 10,000 times that of WiFi at this point in time. But, today, both are technologies of which a user will be unable to connect to the infrastructure in over 90% of the US. And, based upon published timetables, HSDPA will reach the threshold of everyday useability long before WiFi does.

    No one ever said people don't want it....people want to watch Seinfeld reruns on a 2" screen, people want to listen to crappy quality music on a $11 sound subsystem, people want "mexican hat dance" ringtones ...... I don't understand wanting any of those things, in fact I find all of those things grating on my eyes and ears. What I am saying is, it's beyond reason to make case for "needing" it.
  14. #54  
    Jack, when are you going to get that not everyone is you? I wonder if you objected to removable batteries, head phone jacks, removable storage and colour screens also.

    Surur
  15. #55  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE View Post
    ...... I don't understand wanting any of those things
    There, I distilled your your long winded main argument against Wifi in a mobile device.

    Funny thing is I can say the same for just about everything, no one needs IM, no one needs 320x320 resolution, no one needs to browse the internet, no one needs a $700 phone.

    But our economy is not a Marxist one driven by pure need, it is driven by want and to a large extent, "luxury" items like hi-res screens and Wifi. And it is what brings advanced technologies to the masses on a cheap level. At one time people argued you don't "need" a cell phone too.

    And your made up "stories" have no bearing on the issue since all one needs to do is find one person who does prefer using their pda on wifi over booting up, plugging in and heating up a laptop.

    I'm not sure who put in you in a position to argue for our defend our "needs" and let that dictate our features available in devices but I am glad, however, that you have no actual influence on the matter.
    Last edited by Malatesta; 10/25/2006 at 10:54 AM.

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  16. #56  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    There's lots of stuff that hasn't been made public but there's been many, many posts regarding Palm's hiring of dozens of Linux programmers. Another significant fact is that Palm was able to renegotiate its deal with PalmSource as a result of PalmSource's failure to meet OS development deadlines.
    This has always been pure speculation and nonsense about them building their "own" linux OS and I wish it would stop, there is no evidence that they are doing this, yet people like you perpetuate it giving hope to people. It would make sense for them to hire linux programmers to modify ALP for Palm, much like I'm going to make a guess and say they hired WM programmers too. That doesn't mean they are building their own WM OS.

    Speculation has been rampant that Palm is developing their own Linux-based operating system, but certain portions of the annual report would seem to indicate that this isn't the case: rather, that Linux coders were hired early on as part of joint development operations with PalmSource.

    An alternate interpretation is that Palm Inc.'s own development is dependent on intellectual property still owned by PalmSource, and that without this they cannot continue their own projects, which might include a more "classic" version of Access Linux. (source)
    Palm is a hardware company now, much like HTC. They are not "active" in the OS department. They are much too small a company to be making their own OS.

    And I have heard nothing of them renogotiating their deal with Access. Please post your source as I'm curious about it.
    9/02
    Palm hasn't commented at all on ALP or Access' development plans in the slightest since the acquisition, and what we keep hearing is that Palm isn't terribly fond of Access as a company. Combined with some of their reaction to the end of the codevelopment license with Access, the overall impression is that the two companies are going their seperate ways (emph. mine). -A. Brown, chief reviewer of Brighthand (source)
    If they ever came to a new agreement with Access/PalmSource, they never told anybody about it, and their general attitude has seemed to be that they wanted the matter to die quietly.

    Add that to their silence on Access' other announcements, their absence from Access developer meets and demonstrations, and the persistent buzz about a disconnect between Palm and Access, and you start to get the feeling that the only thing keeping them involved is the Palm OS intellectual property.-A. Brown, chief reviewer of Brighthand (source)
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    And how dead can it be when the "what do you want on your next Treo" polls here hows more than 10:1 Palm choice.
    Not only irrelevent it backs up my point about POS users: There is no plan for Palm to use ALP. The companies are going their seperate ways. You'll probably never see ALP here in the States. And Palm OS is dying, very slowly with the only thing keeping it alive is it's dwindiling fan base who refuse to acknoledge these facts. Those polls could be a 1,000,000:1 and would change nothing.

    Your move, Jack.
    Last edited by Malatesta; 10/25/2006 at 01:06 PM.

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  17. #57  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    Jack, when are you going to get that not everyone is you? I wonder if you objected to removable batteries, head phone jacks, removable storage and colour screens also.

    Surur
    I'll accept your statement when you give me one business owner who feels differently. Make your case for ROI on business usage......you keep talking about one, we're still waiting.
  18. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    There, I distilled your your long winded main argument against Wifi in a mobile device.

    Funny thing is I can say the same for just about everything, no one needs IM, no one needs 320x320 resolution, no one needs to browse the internet, no one needs a $700 phone.
    Need is simply this. Every business owner, executive and employee down the line has a duty to the "bottom line". If something has a positive ROI, then a "need" can be established. I can show.... Palm has shown positive ROI's for cell phones and PDA's. Show me a positive ROI for a WiFi equipped Treo. SHoe me a positive ROI for a HSDPA equipped Treo....today.....not when the networks are built out but today. It's simply not going to be there except in extreme "what if" cases.
  19. #59  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    This has always been pure speculation and nonsense about them building their "own" linux OS and I wish it would stop, there is no evidence that they are doing this, yet people like you perpetuate it giving hope to people. It would make sense for them to hire linux programmers to modify ALP for Palm, much like I'm going to make a guess and say they hired WM programmers too. That doesn't mean they are building their own WM OS.
    There's the difference, you're guessing, I am reading the trade press.

    And I have heard nothing of them renegotiating their deal with Access. Please post your source as I'm curious about it.
    Read the TC Forums with regard to the year end report.

    Those polls could be a 1,000,000:1 and would change nothing.
    OK....let me see if I got your postulation right....it's your view that if Palm's customers told Ed Colligan 1,000,000 to 1 that they wanted an alternative to WM5 or they going someplace else, Palm would "change nothing ?

    Your move, Jack.
    I can't move, after that last statement, I'm laughing too hard.

    Maybe you remember this:

    Dear Palm Developer,

    I'm writing to you today because I'm concerned by the number of posts I've read that suggest that Palm's support of Palm OS is either wavering or short-lived. It is neither.

    I thought I had made this perfectly clear with earlier statements, but let me reiterate that our announcement on Sept. 26th that we'll broaden our line of Treo smartphones to include ones made on the Windows Mobile platform is all about growing the Treo market. We want to deliver the Palm experience on Windows Mobile, strengthen our company's ability to deliver ever-more capable solutions and answer current and potential customers' requests for a Windows Mobile-based product from Palm. This is not a zero-sum game! This market is in its infancy, and if we can expand our opportunities by being a strong cross-platform provider of world-class smartphone products, then we should do so. At the same time, this does not mean we need to walk away from our existing products or technology partnerships, like Palm OS.

    It's a fact that a large majority of businesses around the world use a Microsoft-based infrastructure across their IT assets. And many of those companies simply aren't open to products that use another OS. Some of our carriers also have been asking for a Treo on this platform. Finally, many end users in the world are attracted to the familiar Windows user interface. We can either answer that marketplace demand with a Windows-based product, or we can walk away from that business.

    We have a rich product roadmap of Palm OS-based handheld computers, mobile managers AND Treo smartphones that we intend to deliver. Our Palm OS customer loyalty is extremely high, and we intend to continue to earn that loyalty with great Palm OS-based products. We have sold more than 30 million Palm OS-based products over the years, and it is not our intent to walk away from such a strong and loyal user base. That's why in May we extended our license for Palm OS, giving us the right to continue to make and market Palm OS-based products until 2010.

    So, I'd like to ask you to look at our Windows Mobile news as a way to expand our market opportunity. We have every intention of continuing to support our Palm OS developers and to encourage the expansion of the already rich array of consumer and enterprise applications and peripherals for Palm OS. We're pleased Access has initiated the purchase of PalmSource because we believe Access has the resources to really invest in and develop Palm OS.

    Net net, I believe that developing differentiated, software-rich products on a range of industry-standard platforms puts us in a unique position with customers and carriers and helps us expand the market opportunity for us, the developer community and everyone involved in the smartphone category. I hope you will agree.

    Regards,

    Ed Colligan
    Palm, Inc. president and CEO
  20. #60  
    Jack, you are a small god in my world...
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