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  1.    #1  
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/08...ternet_survey/

    Mobile internet is still a turn-off
    Give us maps not blogs


    Most punters still find mobile internet usage to be a frustrating experience they'd rather avoid.

    Despite investment by operators in services such as i-mode and Vodafone Live, 73 per cent of respondents to a new survey said don't access the net from their mobile. Slow-loading pages (38 per cent) and navigation difficulties (27 per cent) were among the reasons cited why people would rather hook up to the net using a PC rather than a phone. A quarter (25 per cent of sites were unavailable to those with mobile phones.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    This is why somebody needs to redesign the phone interface and produce a better web browser as well as plug in a high resolution screen.

    Unfortunately this will be difficult because if you have a high resolution screen, chances are it will be small, so those with sight problems will have a harder time reading the screen.

    Also, just to point out:
    The survey of 1500 UK consumers
    A very small number for industry leaders to make any big decisions.

    Also:

    "At the moment, most websites just aren't flexible enough to be accessed on mobile phones," said Neil Barton, a director of Hostway. "There's nothing wrong with having a flash website with all the bells and whistles you can muster, but you've got to be aware that mobile users simply aren't going to be able to access it. The research illustrates that even if people do wait for sites to load, quite often it's impossible to actually get at the content itself because of the way that sites are built."

    The study suggested that users aren't inherently adverse about using the net on the move. Nine in ten said they'd use mobile internet services providing they could be sure that pages would load faster and they'd avoid high charges.
    This is where cellular providers lowering data rates, and web browsers like the Open Source Nokia S60 Browser (as well as next generation browsers by Opera, Openwave and Access) will play a big role. The S60 browser has a nice feature of keeping everything laid out PC style but resizing columns of text (where possible) the same width of the screen, as well as plugin support.

    Interesting reading.

    -Donald
  3. #3  
    Personally the lack of an unlimited plan, plus broadband at home and work, means that I only surf, email etc very occasionally on the Treo.
    Thought of the day :
    No sense being pessimistic, it probably wouldn't work anyway
  4. #4  
    Lack of unlimited plans means people don't realise the potential of their devices or bother finding out about it. The more people use their devices the more comfortable they would be using them everyday and the more people would begin to surf, the more web pages would be formatted to viewed correctly on mobile devices, etc, etc. From this they could better understand what *everybody* needs to use it better - the more people using it, the more ideas of how to improve the usability would come. Without an unlimited plan how can they hope to encourage more people to use it? (its not very easy to use AND it costs too much, I'm surprised anyone bothers!) look what happened when they made home internet connections unlimited.

    True, the interfaces make it a little difficult but I think the real sticking point is no reasonable priced unlimited plans available.
  5. #5  
    Opera Mini HiRes renders webpages blazingly fast on my Treo 650. 10 times faster than Blazer.
  6. DHart's Avatar
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    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by RodStrod
    Lack of unlimited plans means people don't realise the potential of their devices or bother finding out about it. The more people use their devices the more comfortable they would be using them everyday and the more people would begin to surf, the more web pages would be formatted to viewed correctly on mobile devices, etc, etc. From this they could better understand what *everybody* needs to use it better - the more people using it, the more ideas of how to improve the usability would come. Without an unlimited plan how can they hope to encourage more people to use it? (its not very easy to use AND it costs too much, I'm surprised anyone bothers!) look what happened when they made home internet connections unlimited.

    True, the interfaces make it a little difficult but I think the real sticking point is no reasonable priced unlimited plans available.
    Exactly.

    Mobile Internet Usage Climbs, User Base Too

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/zd/20060814/tc_zd/186063

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