Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1.    #1  
    http://www.tomshardware.com/2006/06/...ess/page9.html

    Though Linux support is largely lacking in the notebook PC market, it demonstrates explosive growth in other mobile segments, including cellular phones, handheld digital assistants, and portable media players. The development of embedded Linux environments for instant-on appliance-like media playback is a strong trend in the consumer appliance market, especially where on-demand multimedia playback is concerned. For example, DVD software vendor InterVideo offers an instant-on media-centric OS that boots up in tens of seconds and operates alongside numerous other operating systems.

    As it stands, Linux is poised to take the mobile phone marketplace by storm. Linux stands to benefit greatly from such rising demand, and early adopters like Motorola have a track history (and the credibility) to play "show and tell" here. Back in 2003, Motorola introduced its first Linux-based smart phone (model A760) that consisted of a personal information suite, audio-video playback components, and a trendy portable instant-messaging client. Shortly thereafter, Motorola unveiled the E680, A768i, and A780 follow-ons, also based on a Linux kernel. Though early market analysis predicted 2005 would be the Year of Linux Mobile Phones, that wasn't exactly the case. Symbian and Microsoft are still there to compete against, and both are also doing quite well. However, the burgeoning phone market has gained great benefits from the same sort of middleware applications that have bolstered Linux support in corporate IT environments.

    Feature phones, smart phones, and mobile phones are the three primary categories where Linux is poised to do best. Units that center around full-featured operating systems represent a new age for mobile telephony. The Zelos Group (a global market research firm) forecasts sales in this segment to grow to 290 million units in 2008 (approximately 42.5% of all handsets). While original device manufacturers are largely divided on the strengths and merits of adopting Linux in a market dominated by Symbian and Windows Mobile, one trend is clear: all of these companies must deal with razor-thin margins while offering innovative features and adhering to a growing and more complex collection of standards. So far, the biggest successes for Linux on this front have been in the pan-Asian markets.
    Phones with "full featured" OS's to be almost 50% of the market within 18 - 24 months .... wow
  2. #2  
    What's really funny about the article (not so funny if you happen to own the Palm operating system) is this sentence from the article:

    Though early market analysis predicted 2005 would be the Year of Linux Mobile Phones, that wasn't exactly the case. Symbian and Microsoft are still there to compete against, and both are also doing quite well.
    Oooh. Where's that owner-of-a-big-slice-of-the-handheld-market, Palm OS, as a potential competitor in the OS arena?
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Tastypeppers
    Oooh. Where's that owner-of-a-big-slice-of-the-handheld-market, Palm OS, as a potential competitor in the OS arena?
    Palm isn't by any stretch of the imagination a worldwide player. This is a worldwide market article....while Palm's share of the US market (30%) is steadily climbing (42% growth last year alone), on the global scene todate they have been a bit player.

    Grew Palm's share of the U.S. converged smartphone/PDA market to 30 percent, up from 22 percent a year ago, according to Canalys.
    http://www.palm.com/us/company/pr/ne...l?reqid=835123
  4. #4  
    Well, statistics prove that in the soccer-mom niche (West San Gabriel Valley Division) Palm is kicking ****.
  5. #5  
    palm may be doing well in the US, but world wide its nheard of.
    No one here knows what the hell palm is.
    No dealers, no support, no ads, no existance at all.
    I had to get mine overseas!
  6.    #6  
    Palm's hiring of whats his-name (I have forgotten but I posted it in another thread) in7 months ago I think is indicative of where they want to go. They growing leaps and bounds here in US and see that E/A market as potentially very lucrative. Ya gotta think the idea is to give him a year or so to set up partners and then release "the thing we ain't suppossed to call Hollywood" in US and E/A. The WM version will be released 1st to get the biggest amount of free press "cause its different. Ya gotat think a non WM version will come behind cause its not different. If it was me, and tehre were no technical glitcahes, I'd release the non WM version with POS just after the WM version (say 2-3 months) and offer a free upgrade to the Linux based POS when it's available.
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by redbelt
    palm may be doing well in the US, but world wide its nheard of.
    No one here knows what the hell palm is.
    No dealers, no support, no ads, no existance at all.
    I had to get mine overseas!
    They have never really made a concerted effort to market there ... a situation that changed when they created a new "grand poobah of worldwide sales" position in November 2005 ... just 7 months ago. "Hollywood" was reported as being the device they were going to use to spearhead that effort.

Posting Permissions