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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by bvbull200 View Post
    You mad?*
    Not really. However, how did your post help the conversation? Most of us here have Android devices and webOS devices or run (or have ran) both Android and webOS on the same device. We have offered constructive material to the conversation. We have been able to back up our opinions with facts that are tangible to the group. We may not like each others comments but we can reluctantly agree to some of the points offered. Your comment was totally useless.
  2. #42  
    WebOS seems more intuitive to me than Android. It can be as simplistic and natural as iOS for those who want to keep it simple, but it has the wonderful development community that makes Android so powerful.
    U.S. Robotics PalmPilot 1000 --> U.S. Robotics PalmPilot Professional --> Palm III --> m505 --> Palm IIIc --> Tungsten T3 --> Samsung SCH-i760 (Windows Mobile) --> Motorola Droid (Android) --> now back to Palm with the Touchpad
  3. #43  
    I just got my touchpad friday from all places fingerhut but glad i saw it in catalog
    I knew i would love it and do. I would like to get one of those hp phones but i am with t-mobile
    can i get one still?
  4. stirling's Avatar
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    #44  
    I really miss WebOS. What I miss is the elegance of the interface. I miss how intuitive it is & how easy it is to customize.
    I left my Pre Plus for a Thunderbolt running Android. The only reason I left was the complete destruction HP made of WebOS' future.
    I love how WebOS is SO easily customizable. With Android you have to do it all or nothing with ROMs. I'm still occasionally trying to flick away apps. And no matter what anyone says, the multitasking on Android just ain't the same animal.
    What i don't miss is the speed WebOS runs at. It's a slow OS and Palm/HP never fixed it. I don't miss the weak App selection. And honestly I don't miss the sorrya$$ hardware builds.
    But if the world went the way I wanted it to, HP would have fixed those things. Sadly, I don't think WebOS will be saved to be a viable contender on phones or tablets.

    Sent from my HTC_Flyer_P512_NA using Tapatalk
    Nothing to see here. Move along.
    @drew3sbs on twitter
  5. #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by k4ever View Post
    Wow, we were actually having a civilized conversation then you had to jump in. You statement doesn't have any merit to it and made everyone here dumber just by reading it.


    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
    Thanks for negating all the dumbness.

    Quote Originally Posted by bvbull200 View Post
    I prefer Android for almost everything. When I want a fussy browser, 4 available apps, and one button forced to (unsuccessfully) do the work of 4, I choose Webos, so it does have its upside.
    You seem to have one button that doesn't do any work.
  6. #46  
    I much prefer webOS. I have a 10 inch Iconia running Honeycomb and a Pre Plus.

    I use my tablet every day and every day I wish I had REAL multitasking--not Android's sorry excuse for it. This is my first Android device. I've found the whole experience to be clunky and difficult. But the apps are available, and the mission gets accomplished. That was my goal in purchasing a tablet--to get a job done.

    Hardware-wise, (speaking only for the Iconia--not all Android tablets are created equal) it's awesome. There are ports all over the thing, so I can hook it up to any number of accessories and periphery--thus making it quite versatile.

    The only downside (for me) to webOS is the lack of apps for the services I want to use. Hardware-wise, it's the lack of ports.

    But webOS, to me, is far better as an operating system.
  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by katefields View Post
    I much prefer webOS. I have a 10 inch Iconia running Honeycomb and a Pre Plus.

    I use my tablet every day and every day I wish I had REAL multitasking--not Android's sorry excuse for it. This is my first Android device. I've found the whole experience to be clunky and difficult. But the apps are available, and the mission gets accomplished. That was my goal in purchasing a tablet--to get a job done.

    Hardware-wise, (speaking only for the Iconia--not all Android tablets are created equal) it's awesome. There are ports all over the thing, so I can hook it up to any number of accessories and periphery--thus making it quite versatile.

    The only downside (for me) to webOS is the lack of apps for the services I want to use. Hardware-wise, it's the lack of ports.

    But webOS, to me, is far better as an operating system.
    Hi Kate. Hope all is well. Well It looks like the TouchPad did not pan out like I hoped the day I saw you in BestBuy. I use it a lot and get a lot done with it. WebOS works better on it than it does on the Pre, but all of the drama surrounding it has been a little too much for me. I haven't yet bit on buying another Android tablet for the reasons you stated in your post. Hopefully HP will change their minds and make new hardware with the OS on it. If not I will use the TouchPad until it is no longer useful or install CM9 on it. My Pre has already become a casualty of this mess. I should have a Galaxy II S in my mailbox by Friday.
  8. Jawbox's Avatar
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    #48  
    The one thing that keeps me dipping my toes back in the android pool is the webOS browser. It seems like every other time I try to use it, it'll just hang on loading a site. The Android browsers just fly in comparison. That's 99% of my touchpad's use.

    Apps aren't such a big deal for me, the ones I use are available in the app catalog, and the other ones, would be accessible through the browser.
  9. #49  
    Android. It's much more a complete operating system. As an original Sprint Pre owner, WebOS isn't complete as it should be. The only useful and positive thing to me about WebOS is the Doctor.
  10. #50  
    ICS will smooth out a lot of rough edges. Some of it is eye candy, some of it is actually useful (web browsing is supposed to be greatly improved). It's AOSP now, so it's only a matter of time before it shows up on the TP.

    Be glad you avoided the kludgy mess that is Honeycomb. It's tolerable, but I can't wait for Asus to release ICS for the Transformer.
  11. #51  
    ICS will smooth out a lot of rough edges. Some of it is eye candy, some of it is actually useful (web browsing is supposed to be greatly improved). It's AOSP now, so it's only a matter of time before it shows up on the TP.

    Be glad you avoided the kludgy mess that is Honeycomb. It's tolerable, but I can't wait for Asus to release ICS for the Transformer.
    Whoa! Whoa whoa whoa, buddy, don't speak ill of Honeycomb here. I mentioned Honeycomb was failure because of the adoption rate and some of the folks around here and the main page wanted to string me up.


    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
  12. #52  
    Honeycomb on google tv is nice so that will handle my android fix. I'll be using WebOS for my tablet and soon to be phone needs til android mature more or start stealing the things from WebOS that makes it great. IF WebOS die it will be right on time for android 5.0. So I got enough time for my love affair for WebOS and hey if it done die than best of both worlds for me.

    Sent from my myTouch_4G_Slide using Tapatalk
  13. #53  
    Quote Originally Posted by k4ever View Post
    Whoa! Whoa whoa whoa, buddy, don't speak ill of Honeycomb here. I mentioned Honeycomb was failure because of the adoption rate and some of the folks around here and the main page wanted to string me up.
    I do think Google released a half-baked OS into the wild -- I love my Transformer, but I realize that if I peeked behind the Honeycomb curtain, I'd see a lot of duct tape and baling wire holding things together. ICS will bring the phone and tablet worlds together under one fully-optimized OS, which might help lure some Android phone owners into the Android tablet fold. The iPad is basically a giant iPhone (with some enhancements of course, but the UI is the same), so an Android tablet not being so alien to Android phone owners will be a good thing.

    It won't magically turn Android tablets into an iOS success story, but they will obviously sell more (as long as the prices come down to the $300 range).
  14. #54  
    I like the idea of webOS better. Basically take the few good, unique parts of it, scrape away the associated downsides, add in all the missing parts, polish it all much more than it is today and offer it with all the other benefits of a system like android and it would truly be better.

    That said, as far as what is available today as a whole, android has it beat in spades.

    -Suntan
  15. #55  
    With plenty of tweaking, I find android to be good looking and user-intuitive (although, admittedly, I had to get used to it's differences).

    No matter how you shake it though - android's more useful. I can't even trust webOS to let me write a few notes without it freezing up when I'm saving in quickoffice (I've lost PAGES of notes this way). That's just unacceptable. Add in the fact that android gives me a massive app catalog, netflix, bluetooth controller support, proper pdf viewing, better e-book support, pulse reader, improved browsing speed/capabilities, and an almost 0-lag implementation of splashtop that can handle multiple-monitor support?

    Sold.

    The -ONLY- thing I don't like about android on my touchpad right now is the current multitouch driver fiddling with my attempts at touch-typing (if I type too fast it's registering as slides and screwing up my typing). It's not a -big- deal since I ordinarily use the bluetooth keyboard anyway, but it's a moderately annoying bug that's slated for fixing. I expect it'll be handled when ICS is released sometime in the next month or so. ICS is the spiritual successor to webOS anyway (lead webOS designer is behind it), so I'm -there-. I'm already loving my touchpad as a CM7 device, toss ICS on there and I doubt I'll ever log back into my webOS.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I like my touchpad:



    New to webOS? Here's my definitive Get Started guide: http://forums.webosnation.com/hp-tou...ted-guide.html

    Want to dual boot Android on your Touchpad? Here's my guide: http://forums.webosnation.com/androi...ted-guide.html
  16. #56  
    Quote Originally Posted by jrstinkfish View Post
    ICS will bring the phone and tablet worlds together under one fully-optimized OS, which might help lure some Android phone owners into the Android tablet fold.
    ...but it really won't. Fragmentation will continue in Android-land due to the plethora of devices that will never receive the upgrade. We'll, also, see phones and tablets on the market that continue to run 2.x or 3.x while others will be on 4.x... I don't expect this to change much in the future, either. It's a mess that isn't going away.
  17. #57  
    Wow, that looks amazing. Which launcher is that?
  18. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by jtfolden View Post
    ...but it really won't. Fragmentation will continue in Android-land due to the plethora of devices that will never receive the upgrade. We'll, also, see phones and tablets on the market that continue to run 2.x or 3.x while others will be on 4.x... I don't expect this to change much in the future, either. It's a mess that isn't going away.
    webOS would be just as fragmented if they had as many product releases. The only thing that makes webOS not look fragmented is that they really only had about 3 revisions of hardware.

    In any case, my 1.45 webOS phone canít do a lot of things that android phones of the same era are still getting updates to do.

    Fragmentation occurs whenever you have significant improvement in hardware and you donít commit to the slow/bloat guarantee of complete backwards compatibility.

    -Suntan
  19. #59  
    Quote Originally Posted by jtfolden View Post
    ...but it really won't. Fragmentation will continue in Android-land due to the plethora of devices that will never receive the upgrade. We'll, also, see phones and tablets on the market that continue to run 2.x or 3.x while others will be on 4.x... I don't expect this to change much in the future, either. It's a mess that isn't going away.
    Ask the average Android user if they are worried about fragmentation, and they'll give you a quizzical look. I'm not denying the problem exists, but just saying it's not a problem that most Android owners really care about. If your phone is running at least 2.1, you're pretty much golden for the vast majority of apps people use on their Android phones, as well as the majority of features they expect.

    Fragmentation has not slowed down the sales of Android phones, so I don't think it factors into anyone's decision to buy an Android tablet. The current slate of official Honeycomb tablets (those being the ones from Samsung, Acer, ASUS, Toshiba, Motorola, etc, the "major" players in a tiny market) will all likely be upgraded to ICS anyway. I am geeked about my Evo 3D (also slated to received ICS) running the same OS as my Transformer
  20. kalel33's Avatar
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    #60  
    As long as the Cyanogenmod guys continue then I'll never have a problem with fragmentation. I'll always have the latest Android OS on my phone.
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